Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 4th World Congress and Expo on Recycling Rome, Italy.

Submit your Abstract
or e-mail to

[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Roberto CAVALLO

International Association for the Environmental Communication

Keynote: PAYT (Pay-As-You-Throw) schemes – a key step for a circular economy and citizens involvement

Time : 08:00-08:30

Recycling Expo-2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Roberto CAVALLO photo
Biography:

He graduated from the Faculty of Agriculture of the ' University of Turin in 1994. In 1996 he founded, together with other shareholders, the cooperative ERICA Soc. Coop. one of the first companies in Italy to deal with waste, both in terms of technical design and communication. By ERICA Soc. Coop. holds up to 1999 as a director only to become, in that same year, President and finally, in 2014, CEO. From 1997 to 1999 he was Minister for the Environment, Agriculture and Civil Protection of the City of Alba. In 2001 he was appointed an expert evaluator for the European Commission Directorate General Research. Since December 2002, he was appointed President of AICA (International Association for Environmental Communication). In June 2003 he joined the Board of Directors of ACR + (Association Cities and Regions for Recycling and Sustainable Management of Resources) of which he was elected vice president in November 2014. In that same year the Ministry of the Environment and the Sea appointment horse vice president of the Scientific Committee for the implementation and development of the National Plan for the Prevention of Waste in office until 2017 (Ministry of Environment, Land and Sea, the Ministry decree Gian Luca Galletti, n. 185 dell ' July 8, 2014)

Abstract:

Waste prevention, prepare for reuse and recycling are the three steps of European hierarchy of sustainable management of waste following European Directive 98/2008. Numerous local initiative demonstrate that the best performing results are obtains when different level of responsibility working together. The common interest is reduce the final disposal of unsorted urban waste, increasing quota of valuable waste and this is possible when the economical and financial streams are transparent and there is a direct influence of behaviour on tax. Different kinds of instruments are been developed during last year in order to calculate the quantity of urban (domestic and commercial) waste produced by the citizens. Best results are obtained through volume measure, using both bins and flexible bags. In village ore scattered area bags with bar code or other system of direct recognition could be best option in cost/benefit; in urban area, with important density population and commercial waste, RFID technology it seems to be best. The most frequent experiences in Italy and Europe are based on the volume of unsorted waste following the principle that more citizens use public services of collection more then pay, recent experience are computing also biowaste and packaging collection. PAYT schemes improve selective collection efficiency (i.e. low frequency, correct volume) reaching high percentage of selective collection, above 80%, with an excellent quality of materials collected (impurity less than 5%). PAYT introduce a high level of consciousness of citizens who change the buying behaviour, choosing product with less packaging, reusable, easy to separate, at the same time the shop improve their ecological offer. So PAY scheme is the best opportunity to create a relationship of mutual responsibility between the different actors of the municipal waste management.

Keynote Forum

Déon Sébastien

Université de Bourgogne-Franche-Comté, FRANCE

Keynote: Is it possible to fully predict removal performances of a nanofiltration process by transport modelling?

Time : 08.30-09.00

Recycling Expo-2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Déon Sébastien photo
Biography:

Sébastien Déon obtained his PhD degree from the University of South Brittany in 2007 on the modeling of transport through nanofiltration membranes. In 2008, he became Assistant Professor at the University of Franche-Comté where he has broadened his areas of expertise to electrokinetic characterizations of membrane materials and fouling cakes. Currently, he is Associate Professor and his skills are mainly dedicated to water treatment by membrane processes. He is also the author or coauthor of one book, twenty six publications in international recognized journals, and some twenty presentations in international conferences. His expertise in reviewing scientific papers led him to become Associate Editor of International Journal of Membrane Science & Technology, Academic Editor of International Journal of Chemical Engineering and an Editorial Board Member of four other peer-reviewed journals.

Abstract:

Nanofiltration can find applications in several environmental or industrial fields since its size and electrical properties make it perfectly suitable to remove small charged pollutants such as metal ions from contaminated effluents. In this context, a predictive tool could be a very useful for process development or optimization. Several approaches are available in literature but the coupling between equilibrium partitioning at the interfaces and the extended Nernst-Planck equation to describe transport within the pores is probably the most convenient approach to model multi-ionic separation. The major limitation for such a predictive model lies in the estimation of physical parameters. In this presentation, several ways developed to determine the input parameters are discussed to check if a fully predictive model is potentially achievable or if it remains a fanciful dream. The presentation will be mainly devoted to estimation of the membrane charge density (Xd) and the dielectric constant of the solution within pores (p), which are the two key parameters of the above-mentioned approach. Firstly, the outstanding predictions of filtration performances obtained with an original numerical procedure based on the simultaneous fitting of multi-component rejection curves will be highlighted. Then, various experimental methods developed recently to determine these physical parameters, such as streaming or membrane potential measurements or electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, will be also presented before discussing their respective advantages and drawbacks for predictive purposes.

Keynote Forum

M. Hesham El Naggar

Western University, Canada

Keynote: Use of Treated Oil Sand Waste in Cementitious Materials for Geotechnical Applications

Time : 08:00-08:30

Recycling Expo-2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker M. Hesham El Naggar photo
Biography:

El Naggar is a Professor and Associate Dean of Engineering at Western University, Canada. He is Associate Editor of the Canadian Geotechnical Journal. He published 350 technical papers/book chapters on foundations, soil-structure interaction and geotechnical earthquake engineering; and consulted on major projects worldwide. He received numerous awards including: Stermac, Meyerhof, Canadian Geotechnical Colloquium Speaker, Western Faculty Scholar, Outstanding Teaching, and Research Excellence Awards. He was elected Fellow of Engineering Institute of Canada and the American Society for Civil Engineers. He also received the Ontario Professional Engineers Medal for Engineering Research & Development.

Abstract:

Oil sand drill cuttings waste is a major challenge for the oil sand mining sector. Many technologies have been developed to treat these cuttings and reduce the amount of waste to be landfilled. One of the recent technologies is Thermo-Mechanical Cuttings Cleaner (TCC), which separates water and oil from the solid waste1. The remaining part of the tailing is fine particles of mainly quartz crystals, which is referred herein as Treated Oil Sand Waste (TOSW). The present work offers innovative solutions for recycling TOSW in cementitious materials manufacture for geotechnical applications, and eventually other applications. The physical, chemical and mineralogical characteristics of the treated oil sand drill cuttings waste were investigated. Fresh and hardened properties for grouts2, concrete and controlled low strength material (CLSM)3 incorporating the treated oil sand drill cuttings waste were evaluated. The results showed that TOSW can be used as partial replacement of cement or sand, or full replacement of fly ash. For example, TOSW was used to replace up to 20% of cement in manufacture of grout used for constructing micropiles without adversely affecting the properties of the grout4. Similarly, TOSW can be incorporated in CLSM as a partial replacement of sand or full replacement of fly ash in CLSM to improve its important fresh properties such as flowability, while satisfying the density, strength and stiffness requirements for CLSM with no environmental hazards. Leaching tests evidenced the reduction in the release of heavy metals compared to that of raw waste indicating successful stabilization/solidification of such waste in the grout or CLSM. Furthermore, TOSW was incorporated into concrete mixture for continuous flight auger (CFA) piles as a partial replacement of up to 30% of natural sand5. It was demonstrated that concrete mixtures incorporating TOSW meet all the performance and environmental requirements of CFA concrete mixtures.

  • Track 1: Waste Management Techniques | Track 04: Waste Water Recycling | Track 10: Rubber Recycling | Track 15: Recycling Basics | Track 17: Textile Recycling
Speaker
Biography:

Stephen W. Brooks is the Chief of the Assets and Logistics Management Division (ALM) of the Federal Law Enforcement Training Centers (FLETC) Glynco campus. As Chief of ALM he is responsible for all the personal property located at four FLETC sites. This includes 32,691 assets valued at $96,190,410.39 dollars located in Charleston South Carolina, Cheltenham, Maryland, and Artesia, New Mexico. He oversees the business lines of inventory management, Fleet management, mail management, property disposal, and the recycling program In 2015 he was named the “2015 Sustainability Hero” for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) for his innovations in recycling solid waste generated by law enforcement firearms training. He has published in the area of recycling and is has been a noted speaker at the 2015 Southeastern Recycling Conference in San Destin, Florida and the 2015 Georgia Recycling Coalition Conference on St. Simons Island, Georgia.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: A common reason given for not recycling is that it is not cost effective and too costly to do. To be successful is easy but one has to shift paradigms to make it work. Whether you are an educational campus, training facility or community, it can be done effectively and efficiently. It will take a shift in culture and thinking in the beginning. That first shift is to stop thinking of all solid waste as “trash”, but rather a commodity that has monetary value in today’s market place of shrinking resources. Recyclable commodities such as old corrugated cardboard (OCC), standard office paper (SOP), aluminum drink cans are no different that gold, orange juice, or pork bellies, they are sold to those companies that need the recyclables as raw material to keep their mills operating, personnel employed, and their products flowing into the stream of commerce around the globe. These recyclable commodities are crucial to saving natural resources when they are processed back into their natural states to begin the manufacturing process all over again. Aluminum can be recycled indefinitely and results in a 95% energy savings and reduces pollution by 95% over tradition saves 4 lbs. of bauxite from being smelting for pound of aluminum recycled. Recycling not only generates positive revenue streams but also, saves natural resources, but also allows for cost avoidance associated with traditional waste collection and disposal.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Jonathan Cocker heads the Firm’s Environment & Environmental Markets Practice Group in Toronto, where he also serves as chair of the Pro Bono Committee. He authored the Global Climate Change Law Guide, and has worked with the Management Board Secretariat of the Government of Ontario. Mr. Cocker has represented a wide range of clients before various administrative boards, the Superior Court of Justice and the Federal Court of Canada, among others.

Abstract:

Industry-Funded Organizers to be Disbanded Currently, each province designates "Industry-Funded Organizations" or IFOs to enlist and coordinate the waste management activities of all of waste diversion participants, including the producers, haulers, recoverors, processors and reusers. These IFOs allocate volumes, set fee structures, rate performance and conduct auditing and performance assessments by all the regulated parties. The results have been viewed as inefficient, costly and creating uncertainty as a barrier to long-term investment and innovation. A call for market forces to dictate waste diversion management has led Ontario to commence disbanding the IFOs and placing the obligations for waste diversion (over a growing range of products/waste streams) back upon the producers/first importers/brand owners with little obligation other than diversion itself. Waste Management "Wild West" in Need of Diversion Expertise / Solutions It is anticipated that the producers will be seeking any number of solutions to discharge their IPR responsibilities for their substantial volumes of regulated waste. IPR only mandates the diversion of waste, but leaves open a variety of recovery and reutilization options previously precluded by the IFOs, but now made possible by the shift to market forces. Producers and related industry parties will be seeking environmentally-sound, yet market savvy strategies for their waste streams and, as North America's first IPR program, the experience and expertise from the European Union and elsewhere is highly valued in giving producers the assurance that waste diversion and environmental compliance will be achieved. As the IPR model will be replicated elsewhere in North America, the current Ontario model offers waste management participants with a rare opportunity to define the future.  This paper will look at the opportunities that a transition to IPR will mean for the waste management industry and their diversion strategies across various regulated waste streams in North America.

E. David

National Institute for Cryogenic and Isotopic Technologies, Romania

Title: Recycling approaches of the aluminum dross to obtain useful products and to preserve raw material sources
Speaker
Biography:

E.David is a Graduate of Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, MS-in Physics-Chemistry of Surface and Analytical Chemistry of “Babes-Bolyai” University from Cluj-Napoca, Romania. She serves as a Doctor in Chemical Science, Assoc. Prof., Head of Department: Carbonic Materials, Composites & Analysis Techniques, at National Research Institute of Cryogenics & Isotopic Technologies- Rm.Valcea, Romania. She is author of more than 20 inventions in the field of environment, energy, waste recycling, materials. The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) awarded the WIPO prize , both at the International Exhibition of Inventions in Geneva, Switzerland (April 2012) and Brussels, Belgium (November 2014), for two inventions in the field of waste recycling and clean energy. She held over 80 lectures at national and international scientific conferences and congresses, has published over 140 scientific papers in prestigious national and international publications. She is member of the World Academy of Materials and Manufacturing Engineering (WAMME), Physical European Society, Association of Computational Materials Science and Surface Engineering, Poland. She acts as reviewer for prestigious International Journals (Journal of Materials Processing Technology; Journal of International Hydrogen Energy; Journal of Hazardous Materials; Waste Management Journal; Resources, Conservation & Recycling Journal; Journal of Analytical and Applied Pyrolysis; et al.) Research activity led to its professional acclaim by appointment as Member of the Scientific Committee of the International Conference and Congress .

Abstract:

The aim of this research is to answer to challenge of how a hazardous wastes can be transformed into raw material source, presenting the particular case of a solid aluminum residue, such as aluminium dross. In this waste it is included and the fine fraction of less than 50 μm, and this waste is considered as a hazardous aluminium waste,among other reasons, because of its poor chemical stability,its spontaneous and exothermic reactivity with water and environmental humidity, generating hydrogen, ammonia, methane, hydrogen sulphide, phosphine, etc.The presence of these phases in the aluminium dross depends on the type of furnace used and above all on the atmosphere inside the furnace, together with the type and quality of the scrap used in each installation. In the first part of this paper there are presented the physico-chemical characteristics and which is the negative impact on the environment and people health of the aluminium hazardous waste, if this is stored in landfill. Then there are shown some examples of our achievements of how this waste can become a useful raw material for obtaining high value added products, how would be to generate hydrogen as a source of clean energy, getting boehemite, alumina and a harmless environmental residue .Further,for the development of aluminium dross recycling process a study on aqueous leaching can offer a new and very interesting economic way. A major problem is the reaction between the AlN amount from the slag and water (vapour or liquid phase), which can produce gas NH3 emission and representing a serious environmental hazard. Such, in the second part of this paper, a leaching process, using water saturated with CO2, is attempted with the aim to retain in situ the ammonia by absorbtion.The laboratory experimental results highlight that the extraction of K and Na salts from the slag are high (> 95 wt.% ) at a solid slag mass to liquid water ratio of 1:25 and 3 hours of leashing ,at room temperature. Also, with a continuous CO2 bubbling at a maximum flow rate of 60 ml/min , the amount of gas NH3 releasing has decreased from 0.3624 mg/l water to < 0.0065 mg/l, highlighting the effectiveness of the NH3 absorption in carbonized water (>97%). By comparison with the results obtained during leaching experiments using pure AlN, this shows that the introduction of CO2 is an impediment to the hydrolysis of AlN. The retention of AlN into the leach residue and the leaching only of the salt cake by carbonated water becomes a promising way toward removal and recovery of the salts from aluminium dross and towards the obtaining from the leach residues of the aluminium oxynitride (AlON), a material with very good ceramic characteristics.

Speaker
Biography:

Marina Zoccola has been working since 1989 as a researcher at the National Research Council, Institute for Macromolecular Studies, textile section of Biella. Her principal interests are in the study and characterisation of biopolymers, mainly structural proteins (wool, fine animal fibres, silk, human hair). She has participated in national and international research projects in the textile and biopolymer field. She was author of over 30 scientific works published in international journals.

Abstract:

The European Union (EU) area has the second largest world sheep population, numbered to about 87 millions (Source EU-Eurostat 2014). The EU flock is made of crossbred sheep not graded for fine wool production. The annual wool clip amounts to about 200 000 t and its management is a specific problem for the EU livestock sector. Indeed, wool from sheep farming and butchery industry is very coarse and contains a lot of kemps (dead fibres), making it practically unserviceable for the textile industry. Unserviceable wool is mostly disposed in landfills or illegally thrown over. Thus, shearing, storage, transportation and disposal of waste wool in accordance with current EU Regulation, heavily weigh on the profit of sheep farming. The Life+ 12 ENV/IT000439 GreenWoolF project aims at converting waste wool into nitrogen fertilizers at a commercial scale for grassland management and organic agriculture purposes. The chemical transformation is based on a green economically sustainable hydrolysis treatment using superheated water. The experiments were carried out in a semi-industrial reactor feeding superheated water and, due to condensation, the wool/superheated water system was maintained for different reaction times. The optimal conditions for this treatment were: 170 oC for 60 min with a solid to liquor ratio close to 1. Chemical analyses such as amino acid analysis and molecular weight distribution performed on the hydrolysis products obtained revealed that the wool was completely degraded, the reaction product containing low molecular weight proteins and amino acids. Several product batches tested for germination showed an index higher than 100% without collateral phytotoxicity. The presence of amino acids, primary nutrients and micronutrients in wool hydrolyzates, along with a concentration of heavy metals below the standard limit, confirms the possibility of using wool hydrolyzates as nitrogen based ecologically sound fertilizer suitable for organic agriculture.

Speaker
Biography:

Daniela Gurau has her expertise in laboratory and in-situ gamma-ray spectrometry measurements and analysis with different type of detectors, radioactive waste assay using complex systems, coincidence summing effects evaluation, detector characterization, Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport. She started to work in the Radiological Characterization Laboratory from Reactor Decommissioning Department, IFIN-HH, in January 2006, and since then she contributed in the development of gamma-ray spectrometry techniques used in radiological characterization and free release of radioactive waste materials, combining experimental methods with theoretical and Monte Carlo simulation procedures. She has various scientific papers and contribution in important research projects.

Abstract:

A main aim of the decommissioning project from Magurele, Romania is to follow the standards and regulations to minimize the radiation doses and to limit the release of radioactive materials into the environment. Concerning the release of materials from the regulatory control, all the waste materials that comes from decommissioning practice are assumed to be radioactive even if the material has not come into contact with any radioactivity. Because of that, in order to protect the health against ionizing radiation, release of materials from regulatory control can be made only if these materials are “free of radioactivity”. Besides the disposal of radioactive waste, a parallel aspect is addressed by the national competent authorities that allow the materials that arise from radioactive practices to be released and reused or recycled if the radioactive content is in accordance with the release conditions. While clearance levels may very well be defined generically, the decision whether to apply clearance levels is an individual decision of the competent authorities on the basis of a case-by-case evaluation of the practice which gives rise to the contaminated or activated material. Direct and indirect measurements of surface contamination and measurement of activity using various gamma-ray spectrometry systems are used by the Radiological Characterization Laboratory to decide what will happen with the materials resulted from decommissioning. In Romania, all the solid materials that comes from nuclear facilities and meet the release criteria are sold for a profit. An innovative method for the recycle of the low level of radioactive concrete (contaminated or activated) has been developed by the Reactor Decommissioning Department from IFIN-HH, allowing to minimize the volume of the radioactive concrete that should be disposed.

Speaker
Biography:

Silvia Dalzero has an architect since 2006 and a PHD in architecture with a thesis about urban transformations in relation to disposal systems waste. She obtained a reserch, at the University of Architecture in Venice, IUAV, in theme of ‘Ruins, debris and rubble in the theaters of war. From decontamination issues and disposal to the configuration of new landscapes’. She collaborates on the teaching at the IUAV in the course of Architectural-urban design (prof. Alberto Ferlenga). She was professor of Theory and practice of architecture (2012/2013), Architecture of the public space (2013/2014) at POLIMI and since 2014/2015 she is professor of Architectural-urban design (in Architectural design workshop 1), at University of Architecture in Milan, POLIMI. Than, She is professor at Academy of Art in the course of Design (in biennium of speciality). She has several publications including the monograph 'Rejected landscapes-Recycled landscapes. Waste disposal and recycling sites, perspectives and contemporary approaches' published in January 2015 by Scholars-press.

Abstract:

This article wants to show the landscape changes in the presence of waste, some touchable reality that invades the territory in many different ways in terms of time and space. Firstly, the issue of garbage is faced following its inevitable accumulation that designs our new and unexpected landscapes... secondly, the focus will be on how waste can be turned into a place. So, how through a list of projects for more or less controlled recovery altered areas, the present territorial dimension is inexorably besieged by garbage and consequently how it is exposed to a substantial environmental, cultural, economic and political alteration. Consequently a sort of ‘indicative atlas’ - where some interesting and reference recovery plans are illustrated - will be shaped. This perspective shows the present conditions and the effective distribution of plants for waste disposal and collection on the European territory in general, and more particularly in Italy: here the study becomes more detailed and a territorial section in Italy, Lombardy, is going to be analyzed. The territorial morphology and the inevitable environmental transformations are also taken into consideration. So, through a study of the present territorial conceptual status, indicative and synthetic models shape up from possible and potential scenarios of areas that are or will be altered in the future. The study of these areas make up a unique path to observe and evaluate the modern urban structure, where presently it is necessary to have a correct, definite location, leading to territorial changes in different ways. Furthermore, this research can contribute to give the right measure of what is at stake, that is different territorial status and other perspectives.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

An efficient way to solve the problem of minimizing chemical industrial wastes is recycling unreacted feed materials. For this purpose the reactor-separator recycle system can be used (Figure 1)  However a feedback causes an appearance of multiplicity of the steady states in the reactor. A problem of the steady states multiplicity in chemical reactor has been examined for a long time by van Herden (Van Heerden,1953)  and other. Also there are numerous articles in which the problem of the steady states multiplicity and stability of the reactor with recycle has been analysed (Luss and  Amundson, 1967), (Kiss, Bildea, Dimian, Iedema and other). The existence of the finite set of steady states (odd number) in the reactor was indicated in all these works. But an appearance of qualitatively new properties in the reactor taking place in the recycle system: reactor – separating unit is possible. It is shown as an existence of continuum (infinite set) steady states in the reactor ( Boyarinov, and Duev, 1980, Boyarinov, and Duev, 2005, Duev and Boyarinov, 2010).  Continuum of the steady states is possible to be only in recycle system for the operational mode with a complete utilization of feed and intermediate reactants.

Speaker
Biography:

Diego Piazza has graduation at Tecnologia em Polímeros from Universidade de Caxias do Sul (2007), master's at Engenharia e Ciência dos Materiais from Universidade de Caxias do Sul (2011) and doctorate at Engineering from Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (2016). He is currently professor mestre (assistente) nível ii at Universidade de Caxias do Sul. He is currently a professor at the University of Caxias do Sul and has held the position of coordinator of the Polymer Technology Undergraduate Course at UCS from 2011 to 2016. He works in the field of polymer nanocomposites, coatings, materials recycling and the processing of polymeric materials by Injection, extrusion, thermoforming and rotomoulding. Participates in the UCS Entrepreneurship program. Integrates the group of researchers with The Ocean Cleanup (Holland) in the study of degradation and recovery of polymers from the marine environment. He has experience in the area of project development and research in the field of materials science and engineering, with emphasis on polymers, polymer materials processing, polymer nanocomposites, organic coatings, intelligent inks, powder paints, and materials recycling.

Abstract:

Introduction: One of the major environmental problems is the ocean pollution. It is estimated¹ that the oceans’ surface holds more than 13.000 polymer fragments/km2. These fragments harm the fauna, since animals’ mistake polymers for food leads to death nearly 100 thousand marine mammals every year2. Synthetic polymers are inert towards degradation, this way, the material tends to accumulate in the oceans as a result of the huge consumption of polymers. This work aims to develop a methodology to recycle polymers found in oceans, comparing their mechanical and rheological properties with virgin polymers.

Experimental :The polymers employed in this work were collected on the beach sand of Kamilo Beach, Hawaii with the help of the The Ocean Cleanup team. Among the collected polymers higher amounts of PE and PP is highlighted. After clean and dried, they were ground in a knife mill. The resulting product had an average particle size distribution of 2 cm and was separated according to different densities. Afterwards the polymers were extruded in a single-screw extruder at the temperature profile of 170/185/200°C for PE and 180/195/210°C for PP. Afterwards, test specimens were obtained by injection, and then submitted to the flexural strength (ASTM D790), and melt flow index (performed under 190°C, 5Kg and 20s for PE; 230°C, 2.16 kg and 10s for PP) tests.

Results: Data obtained for the modulus of elasticity and melt flow index for PP and PE waste had values close to those of the respective commercial virgin resins.

Conclusions Based on the obtained results it is concluded that although the polymers has been exposed to different weather conditions, PE and PP waste can be recycled and bear properties which enable them to be used in the production of new products

Speaker
Biography:

Sandra Regina Scagliusi: Great experience with elastomers. Upgraded in recovering of rubbers, in general, specially dealing with butyl and halo-butyl rubbers (chlorine and bromine). She is deeply involved with irradiation, recycling, de-vulcanization, micro-wave. She developed a new process of rubbers recovering via radiation and mechanical shear. She has been dedicating in research toward environmental area in recycling of solid materials and elastomers. Proved experience in research and quality control laboratories

Abstract:

Polymeric materials (plastics and rubbers) cover a continuously raising proportion of urban and industrial solid wastes discarded in landfills and consequently their impact on environment are more and more concern. Rubbers exhibit a very slow natural decomposition due to their chemical structure weather resistant as well to enzymatic degradation and to microorganisms. Rubber recovering is hampered by its insolubility caused by crosslinked structures. Besides, this tridimensional structure causes various problems for material recovering and reprocessing. Just 8% to 12% of polymeric residues are thermoplastic polymers; remaining are elastomers especially post consumption tires. It is relevant to emphasize that the crosslinking is essential for practical use of rubber and this process is worldwide known as vulcanizing process, discovered by North American Charles Goodyear. The implementation of new technologies in order to reduce polymeric residues, acceptable from the environmental viewpoint and at an effective cost proved to be a great problem due to inherent complexities for polymers reuse. Ionizing radiation has capacity to change structure and properties of polymeric materials. Butyl rubbers have been used in wide scale within a variety of applications such as tires spare-parts and diverse artifacts. Major effect of high energy photon, such as gamma rays in butyl and halo-butyl rubbers is the creation of free radicals accompanied by changes in mechanical properties. This work aims to the development of processes of controlled degradation (de-vulcanizing) of butyl rubber in order to characterize their availability for modification and changes of their properties. Experimental results obtained showed that butyl rubbers irradiated at 25 kGy and further sheared can be used as the starting point for mixtures with pristine rubber.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Antibiotics are extensively being used in our lives for human disease treatment, aquaculture, and livestock operations. Due to the inappropriate wastewater disposal practices, a portion of the antibiotics are discharged into the environment in their original or metabolized forms [1]. Levofloxacin (LEV) is a more recently developed antibiotic belonging to the fluoroquinolones (FQs) which are synthetic broad spectrum antibiotics and is the optical S-(-) isomer of ofloxacin [2]. However, it is difficult to remove LEV from wastewater through traditional biological methods because of its toxicity and low biodegradability [2]. Graphene oxide (GO) is hydrophilic due to the oxygen-containing functional groups on its surface, which renders GO sheet a good candidate for supporting nanoparticles in liquid phase [3]. TiO2 could produce powerful oxidants capable to degrade organic pollutants until total mineralization [4]. Semiconductor materials have been widely studied and used in the fields of pollutant degradation due to their environment friendliness [3]. The aim of the present work was to synthesize a new nanoparticle (G-TiO2) and remove LEV antibiotic from synthetic wastewater at different operational conditions. In order to determine the maximum photodegradation yields of LEV with G-TiO2 composite, the effects of increasing LEV concentrations (1, 5, 25 and 100 mg/L), increasing irradiation times (15, 30, 45, 60 and 120 min), increasing G-TiO2 concentrations (0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2 g/L) and different pH levels (4, 7 and 10) were researched. The maximum removal efficiency of LEV (for 1 mg/L) was obtained as 97% {G-TiO2 concentration: 0.25 g/L, pH: 7, temperature: 21°C, UV power: 300 W, irradiation time: 45 min}. Moreover, six sequential treatment steps were investigated for determination of reusability of G-TiO2 composite. The photocatalytic degradation percentage was reduced from 97% to 74% on first cycle to sixth cycle.

Speaker
Biography:

Huseyin Koca completed his undergraduate education at Anadolu University, Eskisehir, Turkey, and went on to obtain an M.Phil. degree from Leeds University, England. He obtained his Ph.D. from Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Turkey. Currently, he is professor at Anadolu University, Eskisehir, Turkey

Abstract:

The share of electricity production by means of coal fired power plants is over 40% in the World. A large quantity of solid waste are produced each year due to the high ash content of coals. It is estimated that over 750 million tons of coal combustion products, fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag and flue gas desulphurization gypsum, are produced annually in all over the World. Approximately half of these material are recycled or reused as a raw material in cement and construction materials, ceramic making, and extraction of valuable minerals … etc. The rest is simply discarded to landfills that causes severe environmental problems. The European legislative frame work has forced the EU Member States to introduce a waste prevention programme since 2013. They either integrated into their own waste prevention programmes or other environmental policy programmes or established as a standalone programme. Waste prevention programme should describe a minimum waste prevention objectives and implement other preventive measures. The EU’s approach to waste management is based on four principles: waste hierarchy, precautionary principle, principles of polluter pays and producer responsibility and principles of proximity and self-sufficiency. These principles have key roles to achieve sustainable waste management system and environmental protection. In this work recent developments in management of energy plants’ wastes were investigated.

Speaker
Biography:

Hyokwan Bae had been working at Korea Institute of Science and Technology as a research scientist for 11 years (2006-2017). He participated in a number of research projects on nitrogen removal, membrane separation, biofilm and culture-independent analysis of bacterial community structure. After obtaining a PhD degree in Interdisciplinary Program of Bioengineering at Seoul National University in early 2014, his research has been concentrated on the integration of biological reaction and membrane separation processes linked to obtaining high quality reclaimed water and resource recovery (e.g., partial nitrification, halophilic bacteria, forward osmosis, membrane distillation and fouling control). Recently, he joined the faculty of Pusan National University in 2017 to broaden and improve his specialty in civil and environmental engineering.

Abstract:

Forward osmosis (FO) and biological nitrification processes were integrated in this study. High strength ammonia wastewater of 2500 mg-N/L was partially nitrified at an ammonia conversion rate of 1.34 ± 0.25 kg-N/m3-day under the limitation of an acidification buffer, i.e., HCO3-C/NH4+-N = 1, as a control factor. To mitigate the membrane fouling, direct contact between the biomass and cellulose triacetate FO membrane was avoided by employing PVA/alginate-immobilized nitrifiers in the bioreactor. The simultaneous FO process concentrated the wastewater at concentration factors (CFs) of up to 2.34 during the partial nitritation (PN) reaction. As a result, the concentration of total dissolved solids (TDS) ranged from 13.6 g/L to 35.7 g/L. It was found that salinity higher than 17 g-TDS/L inhibited the activity of the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, but not the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. Then, the nitrogen content of wastewater was further concentrated using direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD). The ratio of transferred ammonia to water (i.e., specific ammonia transfer: SAT) was controlled by operational conditions of membrane materials, pH and temperature. It was identified that free ammonia (FA) concentration has a critical role on SAT values under different total ammoniacal nitrogen concentration and pH. Thus, the acidification pretreatment was essential to minimize the FA concentration in the feed before operating the DCMD system. Taken together, membrane-based dewatering processes were effective to reduce the water contents in the wastewater and the remained nitrogen contents can be utilized as a concentrated fertilizer.

Speaker
Biography:

Handan Akülker graduated from Chemical Engineering and Genetics. Bioengineering double major  program at Yeditepe University with full-scholarship in 2012. She worked at State Hydraulic Works as an analyst for 3 years. Then, she started to work as a research assistant at Ondokuz Mayıs University in 2016. She is still a master student at Chemical Engineering Department.

Abstract:

Colored organic effluents are produced in different industries, i.e. textiles, paper, leather, plastics, rubber, cosmetics etc.  Discharging of dye effluents into water resources even in a small amount can affect the aquatic life. Dye ions are commonly removed from aqueous streams through coagulation-precipitation, ion exchange, ultrafiltration, nanofiltration, reverse osmosis, electro dialysis and solvent extraction. These methods are expensive. Adsorption is the most popular method for wastewater treatment due to its easy and inexpensive operation. In this study removal of malachite green dye ions from aqueous solutions using natural and activated clay adsorbents was studied. The effects of contact time, initial dye concentration and adsorbent dosage on malachite green dye removal efficiency were examined in a batch system. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin adsorption isotherm models. The pseudo-second order, Elovich and intraparticle diffusion kinetic models were applied to the experimental data in order to describe the removal mechanism of dye ions using natural and activated montmorillonite clay. The results show that natural and activated montmorillonite is an alternative low-cost adsorbent for removing malachite dye ions. 

Speaker
Biography:

Katarzyna Kulhawik has graduated from 5- year master’s degree studies in the field of Environmental Protection of Poznań University in Poland. She so much interested in environmental protection that she has started postgraduate extramural studies (doctoral). Her speciality is environmental protection including waste management. The topic of her research is the functioning of recycling in the system of waste management based on the example of the district of Głogów. Besides scientific activity she train workers in the field of waste management

Abstract:

After the implementation of a new waste management system, in which recycling is the most dominating process, landfill disposal still appears to be the most popular method of waste management in Poland. In which waste undergoes gradual decomposition and the influence of climate conditions, for example, air and atmospheric fallout, leads to the production of leachate and biogas emissions, which contribute to continual threats to the natural environment and humans. The above-mentioned threats can be limited by applying suitable techniques of waste treatment before its disposal. A technology that is oriented to these aims is a mechanical biological treatment. The results of this technology is waste stabilisation and reduction of pollutant emissions. Additionally, it allows to increase the recovery of materials for recycling and to reduce the mass of waste ( it is environmentally friendly). Finally will be described differences (advantages disadvantages) between direct disposal versus mechanical- biological treatment.

Speaker
Biography:

Handan Akülker graduated from Chemical Engineering and Genetics. Bioengineering double major program at Yeditepe University with full-scholarship in 2012. She worked at State Hydraulic Works as an analyst for 3 years. Then, she started to work as a research assistant at Ondokuz Mayıs University in 2016. She is still a master student at Chemical Engineering Department.

Abstract:

Zinc is one of the most plentiful elements in the Earth. Its concentration both in soil and water is increasing because of industrial activities, such as mining, coal and waste combustion and steel processing. Despite being handled by humans, too much of it can still pose fatal diseases. Therefore, Zinc is studied to be removed from water by using several methods. With respect to recent studies, Alginate has been suggested to be harmless to both environment and human health due to its biodegradable composition. Hence, it is widely used in adsorption processes. The aim of the study was to remove Zinc (II) ions from water by using Ca-Alginate microspheres and also to design the adsorption by full factorial method. Na-Alginate and CaCl2 were used to synthesize Ca-Alginate hydrogel microspheres with approximately 4 mm diameter in wet form. Microspheres were chosen to be synthesized instead of gel form in that their high surface area per their small weight could boost the efficiency of adsorption. In order to determine the significant parameters of adsorption, 23 full factorial design was performed. The combined effects of adsorbent dosage on, temperature during adsorption and initial concentration of water were examined. For three parameters, minimum and maximum values were determined to be performed. According to these values, eight experiment sets were carried out. The results of these experiments were statistically analyzed by using the student’s t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and an F-test to define important experimental factors and their levels. A regression model considering the significant main and interaction effects was suggested. In conclusion, using Ca-Alginate hydrogel microspheres can be plausible and environmentally friendly method for adsorption of Zinc from water.

Speaker
Biography:

Rusnam is a lecturer in the department of Agrilcultural Engineering Faculty of Agircultural Technology, Andalas University, Indonesia. His latest work is as a researcher in the fields soil and water engineering. His currents research is about related to agricultural water quality in the area of West Sumatera province, Indonesia. He is now teaching some subjects such as hidrology, soil and water conservation and environmental science.

Abstract:

This research was conducted on July – October 2013 about a mercury analysis which has been performed in Environmental Engineering Laboratory of Engineering Faculty, Andalas University. The level of mercury that is permitted by Government Regulation Republic Indonesia No. 82 of 2001 at the fourth grade for water is at 0.005 mg/l. In that analysis, mercury contents with 0.020169 mg/l at irrigated areas in Batang Hari River. This research aims to find out the ability of water lilies (Salvinia molesta), wood lettuce (Pistia stratiotes), and water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) to decrease the content of water level. This research used experimental methods and the initial content of heavy metals mercury (Hg) by using 0.02 mg/L, 0.06 mg/L, and 0.1 mg/L. The results at decreasing concentrations of heavy metals mercury will be compared with the quality standard of heavy metal mercury at the fourth grade of water. The result showed that water lilies (Salvinia molesta), wood lettuce (Pistia stratiotes), and water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) were able to fix the water quality for irrigation which contaminated heavy metal (Hg). Then, mercury concentration reached a quality standard for irrigation at early concentration 0.02 mg/L during the 15 days and at early concentration 0.1 mg/L during 35 days. From the analysis, it was found that Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) is the best plant to decrease the concentration of heavy metals mercury.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

The objective of this research paper is to study about the waste tyre crumb rubber granules as a partially concrete replacement by different percentage of facing layer thickness and without facing layer in the production of rubber cement composite paver block. The physical properties of RCCRP compressive strength, flexural strength, abrasion strength density, and water absorption testing by the IS 15658:2006 method. This all physical properties are depending upon the ratio of crumb rubber uses. The result showed that the with facing layer at 15 mm, 25 mm,totally rubberized and without facing layer had little effect on compressive strength, flexural strength and abrasion resistance properties. The absorption of water is also important for the service life of the product. The crumb rubber paver block also performed quite well in both compressive strength and abrasion resistance. The rubber cement composite paver block is suitable for nonstructural purpose such as lightweight, easily installation for the walkway, sidewalk and playing area application.

Speaker
Biography:

I am an engineer and expert in environment and sustainable development. During my 20-year career, I have been involved in all aspects of administrative and technical management of environmental issues in my area. I first started in the administrative sector, where I had the chance to be involved in the development projects development and management program. I have not only witnessed the advancement of development towards modern facilities such as technical landfills, recycling and composting facilities, and wastewater recycling, but it also gave me the opportunity Learn more and develop my own skills.

Abstract:

Algeria is in the category of poor water resources according to the scarcity threshold set by the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) or the World Bank at 1,000 cubic meters per capita per year. It is currently estimated at 500 m3 and will be only 430 m3 in 2020, according to projections made by the UN. (Source MRE). So she can not turn the Back to this Opportunity and reuse this purified or naturally purified wastewater considering these COMMITMENTS OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT. Algeria has all the keys to a successful transition and to control the quality of wastewater uses. It is necessary to recognize that scientific knowledge helps in the integrated and sustainable management Scientifically "To each use of the water its adapted source. Gout Ideal! Ideal for Health, Ideal for Soil, Ideal for Finished Product Cheap and sustinabl Assured. The "ideal drop" is the guarantee for each context of an optimal and specific technology (expected quality and quantity of water, storage, irrigation mode ...). It must also lead to economic and social profitability while preserving risks to health, agronomy and the environment. Treating water excessively kills the profitability of agricultural projects. Conversely, poor control of the risks would lead to failures jeopardizing the future of the reuse of Domestic wastewater. The reflection on treatment must be carried out from the downstream of the water chain and the water must be treated according to the use that is made of it. Irrigators and water caterers are then obliged to work in synergy and seek the best compromise, ideal gout and share best the benefits.

Peter Tumwet Cherop

Durban University of Technology, South Africa

Title: Kinetics of granulated scrap tyre pyrolysis via thermogravimetry
Speaker
Biography:

Peter Cherop is a Doctorate student in the Department of chemical engineering at Durban University of Technology. He holds a Master’s degree in chemical engineering from D.I. Mendeleyev University of Chemical Technology. He has expertise in process control, optimisation and pollution control and has previously worked in the cement manufacturing industry as a process engineer. He has experience in teaching and research having worked as tutor and researcher in institutions of higher learning. His key areas of interest are waste management and environmental pollution control.

Abstract:

The global consumption of tyres has increased over the years. However a very small percentage of the total mass of waste tyres can be recycled or reused for other applications. Land-filling has been considered an option to address the problem of scrap tyres. However, large space is required and the reusable resources are wasted. This therefore has led to environmental and economic problem of the disposal of the huge mass of scrap tyres. Scrap tyre pyrolysis, which is basically the thermal decomposition in an oxygen-free atmosphere, can be potentially involved with the recovery of both energy and material. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and derivative thermogravimetry (DTG) are the techniques commonly used to measure the mass loss kinetics associated with the vaporisation of materials during pyrolysis. Understanding the kinetics of pyrolysis is important in the optimisation design of industrial scale scrap tyre recycling. The purpose of this study was to determine the thermal degradation kinetics of scrap tyres by TGA/DTG, and to compare the apparent activation energy (Ea) and the pre-exponential factor (A) values calculated using   the Arrhenius, Coats–Redfern and Flynn-Wall-Ozawa methods. The experiments were conducted under a nitrogen atmosphere and a temperature range of 20°C to 600°C at different heating rates. The thermal decomposition started at an average temperature of 240°C and was complete at 480°C for the four heating rates. Results indicate that higher heating rates lead to greater mass losses. The average mass loss was 63.64 wt. %. The mean Ea values obtained by the different model free methods used were similar. However there was a variation in the pre-exponential factor values.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Deal with electrical flashovers problems, silicone is the ideal material used for coating insulators systems to improve their performances. This paper deals with the thermal treatment effect on the ageing phenomenon of Silicone coated insulators in service. At this purpose, a physico-chemical experimental study of Silicone Rubber films thermally treated and untreated is undertaken. At first, accelerated electrical degradation tests were conducted under a growing alternating 50 Hz homogeneous electrical field. A series of surfacic breakdown is carried out on this polymer, in both its two states to characterize its performances by measuring the dielectric strength El, the capacitor Cx and the loss factor tgδ. The measurements are performed on virgin (Vg), electrically aged, and electrically aged-heat treated samples. In this latter case, the electrical ageing is performed on relaxed sample during 24 hours, after a heat treatment at a temperature T = 100 ° C during tT =100 hours. Cx and tgδ are measured under a root mean square voltage in the range of 10 V to 110 V with frequencies of 10 Hz to 1100 Hz using the Schering bridge. Then series of chemical analyses, as an Infrared spectroscopy and a X- Ray Diffraction were performed to monitor the degradation at microscopic scale. Electrical and chemical measurements have evidenced the constraints effects on the silicone ageing phenomenon, and a correlation between the different results was established. It has been observed that the electric stress results in the alteration of silicone dielectric properties while the thermal treatment slows down the Silicone electrical aging process. Silicone’s electrical ageing results from the production of an oxidation mechanism, a phase change (crystalline to amorphous) and a surface alteration due to the discharge occurrence. This results in the decrease in both its dielectric strength and capacity and the increase in loss factor. Heat treatment of short duration has improved the silicone dielectric properties through oxidation process activity decrease under applied electric field stress.

N. Dakhili

Iran University of Science and Technology, Iran

Title: Chloride removal from the secondary source of zinc
Speaker
Biography:

Nafiseh Dakhili has completed her Master at the age of 25 years from Iran University of Science and Technology with Thesis in Subject:  Recovery of Zinc from the Final Slag of Steel’s Galvanizing Process by Pyro and Hydro Metallurgical Treatments and with GPA: 15.03 (out of 20). Then she works as Commercial Manager at Faragostar Altoon production and Commerce Company. She has 6 papers which presented at international conferences.

Abstract:

Zinc containing wastes/secondary's such as zinc ash, dross, flue dusts, sludge, residue etc. are generated in various chemical and metallurgical industries. The materials contain different level of impurities depending on the source. If zinc content material, like zinc ash and zinc slag, contains various amounts of chlorides like zinc chloride, zinc oxy-chloride, which comes from ammonium chloride and other chloride fluxes used by galvanizers, the chloride content has to be removed for the evaluation of this secondary resource for recovery as zinc metal or zinc oxide. The results (of the galvanizing slag’s treating that left after some pyrometallurgical presses) indicate that roasting at 800 °C for 30 min, followed by alkali washing treatment, at 70 °C for 45 min by 1/6 solid/liquid ratio and 1.5 times the stochiometric amount, will useful for chloride removal with 94% efficiency.