Scientific Program

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Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Kunio Yoshikawa

Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan

Keynote: Solid fuel production from non-segregated municipal solid wastes employing the hydrothermal treatment

Time : 09:00-09:30

Recycling Expo-2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Kunio Yoshikawa  photo
Biography:

Kunio Yoshikawa was born in 1953 in Tokyo, Japan. He is a professor of Tokyo Institute of Technology and an associate editor of Applied Energy. His bachelor, master and doctor degrees were awarded from Tokyo Institute of Technology. His major fields are energy conversion, waste management and environmental engineering. He has been working in Tokyo Institute of Technology for more than 38 years as a research associate, an associate professor and a professor. He has published nearly 200 journal papers with the major award of AIAA Best Paper Award, ASME James Harry Potter Gold Medal, JSME Environmental Technology Achievement Award and Best Educator Award of Tokyo Institute of Technology.

Abstract:

Up to now, the only commercialized ways of municipal solid waste (MSW) treatment are mass land-filling and mass burning. In Japan, most of burnable wastes are incinerated, but not in other countries, and still land-filling is the most popular way of waste treatment all over the world. But the world recent trend is to prohibit or limit land-filling of wastes while citizens do not want to increase waste incineration in developed countries as well as developing countries. On the other hand, major part of the world is discharging non-segregated municipal solid wastes. Thus we have to find out the utilization ways alternative to incineration for non-segregated MSW. Pre-treatment of wastes requires crushing, drying and deodorizing, which are normally different processes. But we have developed innovative hydrothermal treatment technology (HTT) which can perform these three pre-treatment functions in one process utilizing high pressure saturated steam. Figure 1 shows the operating principle of HTT. Non-segregated MSW are fed into the reactor, and then, 220℃, 2.5MPa saturated steam is supplied into the reactor for about 30 minutes and the blades installed inside the reactor rotates to mix MSW and steam for about 10 minutes. Then the product is discharged after extracting steam. The product is powder-like substance and the moisture content is almost the same as the raw material, but is easily dried by natural drying. The inert material such as metal, glass and stones can be easily sieved out after drying. There is almost no bad smell in the solid products, and the products can be used as solid fuels which can be easily mixed with coal for power generation or cement production. Only 10-15% of the product is enough for steam production in a boiler. HTT has already commercialized in Japan, China and Indonesia.

Keynote Forum

Aeslina Abdul Kadir

University Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, Malaysia

Keynote: Wastes Recycling Into Fired Clay Bricks: A Review

Time : 09:30-10:00

Recycling Expo-2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Aeslina Abdul Kadir photo
Biography:

Aeslina Abdul Kadir was born in Batu Pahat, Johor, Malaysia, on 21st of July 1980. Graduated with B.Sc. with honours in Environmental Science at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) in 2002 followed by M.Eng. in Civil Engineering at University Teknologi Malaysia (UTM) in 2004 and PhD in Civil Engineering at RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia (2010). Her expertise is in solid waste management and solid waste recycling into building material. She had published more than 50 publications including proceedings, journals, books and modules. In addition, her passion in research has enable her to secure almost 2 million worth of grants. Assoc. Prof. Dr. Aeslina binti Abdul Kadir also is a member of International Water Association (IWA), International Solid Waste Association (ISWA), Malaysian Society of Waste Management and Environment (MSWME), Malaysian Society for Engineering and Technology (mySET), Concrete Society of Malaysia (CSM) and Malaysian Research and Innovation Society (MyRIS).

Abstract:

Brick is one of the most common masonry units used as building material. Due to the demand, different types of waste have been investigated to be incorporated into fired clay brick for example sludge wastes, agricultural wastes, fly ash, fuel wastes and other wastes. Previous investigations have demonstrated positive effects on the physical and mechanical properties such as lightweight bricks with improved shrinkage, porosity and strength. However, reduced performances in number of cases were also demonstrated. In addition, the high temperature in the firing process allows volatilization of dangerous components through emissions, changes the chemical characteristics of the material and eliminates the toxic components through fixation process. Therefore, this alternative disposal method for the waste may provide sustainable method to immobilise toxic chemicals that pose a very high risk to the environment through either leaching or emissions as well as providing a new construction product with improved properties providing the mix is appropriately designed and prepared for the required properties.

Keynote Forum

Doron Lavee

Tel-Hai College, Israel

Keynote: Can a monopoly increase the welfare of its consumers?

Time : 10:00-10:30

Recycling Expo-2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Doron Lavee photo
Biography:

Doron Lavee holds a PhD in Public Economics from the Ben-Gurion University, an MA in Economics and an MBA in Business Administration and Economics from the Hebrew University. He is a member of the Department of Economics and Management at Tel-Hai Academic College. He also serves as a Partner and General Manager of Pareto Group Ltd. He is a well-known expert with over 22 years of experience in economic and environmental consulting, financial advisory and strategic consulting in various fields, including issues related to economic efficiency and the periphery. He has extensive experience in managing complex projects and large-scale environmental economic consulting and conducting projects for the public and government sectors, including government ministries, local authorities, government corporations and public agencies.

Abstract:

Demand uncertainty may be a significant barrier for firms to enter the market. This study suggests that an establishment of a monopole which absorbs demand uncertainty by commitment to determine a long-term stable price may be efficient by reducing the uncertainty level. An economic model examines the social welfare consequences of establishing such a monopsony in the waste recycling market in Israel. The model provides a good description of many other markets with high entry cost and price volatility. The results show that an establishment of a monopsony in the waste recycling market could be an efficient process from a social welfare perspective (welfare increasing); this depends on the market's uncertainty level and the technological changes resulting from eliminating uncertainty. In the case study shown in Israel, creating a regulation that allows larger municipalities to sell the waste at competitive prices (international market prices) and allows small municipalities to recycle at a monopsony price, will lead to improved social welfare. The novelty of this study stems from the proof that a monopsony may increase the market size in markets with high levels of uncertainty, thus increasing the consumers benefit. A monopsony creates "certainty benefits" by reducing the risk premium arising from price fluctuations and the entrance of new players, and although it gains excessive profits, the benefit of reducing uncertainty may be greater than the loss of a monopolistic exploitation.

  • Agricultural Waste Recycling | Circulatory Economy | E-waste Management | Metal and Plastic Recycling | Recycling Market | Thermal Waste Recovery

Session Introduction

Md Abdul Jalil

Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Bangladesh

Title: Up-gradation of Matuail Solid Waste Disposal Site in Bangladesh to a Sanitary Landfill
Speaker
Biography:

Md Abdul Jalil is a Professor of Civil Engineering Department at Bangladesh University of Engineering & Technology (BUET), Dhaka, Bangladesh. He received his BSc in Civil Engineering in 1986 from BUET. He obtained his MSc in Civil Engineering in 1988 from the same university. He received his PhD in Civil Engineering in 1993 from Tokyo University, Japan under ADB Scholarship. He conducted Post-doctoral research on Water Management in Loughborough University, UK under Commonwealth Fellowship. He was appointed as a Lecturer in the Department of Civil Engineering of BUET in 1986. He was promoted to the post of Assistant Professor in 1989. He became Associate Professor in 1996 and Professor in 2001. He has published over 36 papers upto now. His current research areas are biogas generation from solid wastes, water and wastewater treatment technologies, and rain water harvesing. He also works as a Consultant and completed over 45 important national development projects.

Abstract:

From the very beginning, Matuail landfill site was being used for crude dumping of solid waste of Dhaka City. Dhaka City Corporation decided to improve the dump site to a sanitary landfill and to design a new sanitary landfill at the acquired land adjacent to this site. A detail soil exploration was carried out and significant variation in soil strata was identified. A clay layer of 7.8–45 m was found having permeability in the order of 10-5 to 10-7 mm/s. The leachate of the landfill contained a number of pollutants in very high concentrations. Analysis of a water sample from a nearby tubewell revealed that a few parameters exceeded the drinking water quality standards. The pre-project environmental condition of the landfill site had the usual characteristics of an open dump site - filthy, smelly, and breeding ground of flies and mosquitoes. Oozing out leachate caused flooding of roads during rainy days and surface water pollution around the landfill site. Groundwater pollution potential was found to be very low. Local drainage congestion, filthy environment, breeding of flies and mosquito, obnoxious odor in the surrounding, fire hazards, air and noise pollution were some of the potential adverse environmental impacts during construction and operation phases of the landfill. Occupational health and safety of the workers at the landfill site including the waste pickers were of great concerns. Collection, treatment and safe disposal of excess leachate from the landfill site were given top priority to mitigate possible impacts on environment. Storm water drainage system was constructed around the landfill for efficient drainage of rainwater away from the landfill site. The peripheral slope was covered with thick clay layer. The decomposable fresh waste in each cell was covered by stabilized solid waste from the landfill site. A semi-aerobic system was installed to prevent accumulation of gases in the landfill. An effective environmental monitoring program was developed. The important landfill facilities of Matuail sanitary landfill were embankments, roads, platforms, storm water drainage system, leachate collection system, semi-aerobic system of waste stabilization, leachate treatment system, control building, weighbridge, car wash pool, flood light system, electrical sub-station and water supply and sanitation systems. Laboratory studies were conducted to determine design parameters to treat the leachate in aerated lagoons. The lagoons were designed as plug flow reactor. Sludge and treated effluent recycling to the waste dump was proposed as the disposal option. The construction of working road was started first, followed by new embankments, the civil structures in the control area, the flood lighting system, the drainage systems, roadway and platform, semi-aerobic system and finally the leachate treatment system. The major problems faced during the construction phase were related to working road, temporary platform, drainage system, new embankments and permanent platforms. The most severe problem was the failure of the new embankments at a number of sections. All these problems were solved by a critical analysis of each site specific problem and suggesting appropriate solution. As a result, the project was implemented successfully.

Speaker
Biography:

Muscolo Adele graduated in Biological Sciences (MSc), has completed her PhD in Food Science at the age of 26 years at the Policlinic Federico II University of Naples, Italy. In 1988 she started is professional carrier as researcher at “Mediterranea” University of Reggio Calabria where she is still working as Full Professor in soil chemistry and ecology. Since 1990 she is reviewer for International Scientific Journals and since 2008 she is evaluator of projects for European Community, International Funding Research Agencies and Italian and Foreign Research Ministeries. She is chair of many Regional, National and International research projects.. She is examiner of international PhD dissertation. She published more than 180 papers in international journals with IF and has been serving as an editorial board member of many International Journals. She is Associate Editor for JFR.

Abstract:

In recent years, research is increasingly oriented towards the use of agronomic techniques to improve the productivity in terms of quantity and quality of products, promoting the conservation of natural resources, protecting the soil resource and reducing the environmental impact. In Mediterranean area, crop production is suffering mainly for the loss of soil fertility and the consequent massive use of expensive macro- and micro-nutrient inputs for which agriculture is almost totally dependent on imported products or on fertilizers produced with expensive industrial processes, which generates greenhouse gases (GHGs). In view of the above considerations, this study was conducted to determine the chemical characteristics of six composts obtained with organic wastes from different sources. The fertilizer power was assessed on soil and plant. Waste characteristics influenced the chemical properties of the compost much more than composting process. The obtained compost had a positive effects on soil with an increase in soil organic matter, nutrients, MBC, and bacterial and fungal population that differed in respect to compost features. The best result on soil, was obtained by using the compost produced with a mix of broadleaf vegetables. Regarding crop productivity, the data showed a specificity between crop and type of compost used.

Speaker
Biography:

Masayuki HOJITO is a professor of Kitasato Univsersity, Towada, Aomori, Japan. His scientific career over 30 years has been based on Soil Science. He is coordinating the University Farm: The Yakumo Experimental Farm is located in southern Hokkaido and it is a unique practical farm, which has established a self-sufficient resource-recycling system. Fertilizers, chemicals or feeds from outside are completely restricted. The farm produces the Kitasato Yakumo Beef (with a Registered trade name) that is the first certified organic beef in Japan. The crucial factor in this process is the management of white clover. Chemical fertilizers are not used and only well-composted cow manure is applied onto the clover-mixed grasslands. Utilizing this method it has been demonstrated that organic and safe beef can be produced using a 370-hectare natural ecosystem without causing any environmental pollution. In essence this system demonstrates that solar energy produces beef.

Abstract:

Nutrient recycling should be effective at balancing nutrient flows in Japanese animal production. This means replacing imported feed with self-produced feed. The Yakumo Experimental Farm of Kitasato University has produced commercial beef under “organic” management, without the use of agricultural chemicals or imported feed, since 2005. Using a dataset obtained from 220 ha of grassland and 250 head of cattle over the 5 years from 2008 to 2012, we estimated nitrogen (N) flow. During 2011 and 2012, we measured grass production, cattle production (selling out), soil parameters, and atmospheric deposition (from precipitation and atmospheric ammonia concentrations). To determine N fixation by clover, we compared grass + clover plots with grass-only plots. Averaged over the period, N components on the 220 ha of grassland comprised 1952 Mg soil N stock, 3.2 Mg N yr−1 in living livestock, 14.3 Mg N yr−1 uptake by grass growth (including 8.6 Mg yr−1 of N fixed by clover), 15.7 Mg N yr−1 applied in composted manure, 1.7 Mg N yr−1 in imported bedding material, 2.8 Mg N yr−1 in deposition, and 1.41 Mg N yr−1 in meat production. N in composted manure equaled about 0.8% of the huge soil N stock; N in grass production equaled about 0.7%, of which clover fixation supplied 60%; N deposition was not negligible; and N export by meat production was minor. These results show that on this organically managed farm, soil N stock increased gradually (by 8.6 Mg N yr−1 [220 ha]−1 = 39 kg N ha−1 yr−1 = 0.44% of the soil N stock) and N export was small. Our findings show that it is possible to balance N inputs with N outputs in a beef cattle enterprise without the need for feed or fertilizers 

Youn-Woo Lee

Seoul National University, South Korea

Title: Recycling of valuable metal during supercritical water oxidation

Time : 12:00-12:25

Speaker
Biography:

Youn-Woo Lee has completed his PhD in 2004 from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, USA. He is a Professor in the School of Chemical Sciences of Seoul National University, Korea. He is exploring the use of supercritical fluids as environmentally acceptable alternatives to conventional solvents for chemical and physical process. The current areas of application for supercritical fluids are numerous and include particle design, material synthesis, chemical reactions, separations, recycling, and cleaning. He has over 180 publications and 30 patents. He is a member of Korea National Academy of Engineering since 2014. He has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of the J. of Supercritical Fluids and J. of CO2 utilization as well as an Associate Editor of Green Materials.

Abstract:

Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) process appears to be a viable and effective technique for recovering metals and the destruction of hazardous organics in industrial chemical process wastewater. It is demonstrated that the integration of SWS and SCWO create synergetic effect. Wastewaters from Cu-plating process, acrylonitrile manufacturing plant, liquid crystal display (LCD) manufacturing plant, and terephthalic acid (TPA) manufacturing plant were treated by SCWO not only to decompose hazardous organic compounds but also to recover valuable inorganic materials. A SCWO process was developed for treating wastewater from TPA manufacturing process which contains many organic acids such as 4-carboxybenzyl aldehyde, terephthalic acid, benzaldehyde, benzoic acid, p-tolualdehyde and p-toluic acid and inorganic compound such as cobalt and manganese acetate. During the supercritical water oxidation of organic acids, nano-particles of cobalt manganese oxide in situ formed in the reactor act as an oxidation catalyst to enhance the oxidation rate of organic acid so that one can either reduce reaction temperature or shorten residence time (Figure 1). Total organic carbon of wastewater was 37,480 ppm and was reduced to 200 ppm after reaction. Co-Mn catalyst in the TPA wastewater was recovered above 99% as cobalt manganese oxide and the size of Co-Mn oxide particles was ca. 260 nm. Figure 2 shows the commercial plant for treating TPA waste residue slurry by SCWO.

Figure 1: Schematic process flow for treating TPA waste by SCWO as well as recovery of catalysts

Figure 2: TPA waste residue slurry treatment plant by SCWO

Speaker
Biography:

Ing. Lucía Pérez Amaro, PhD. has her expertise in Polymeric Materials Science and Technology. Dr. Perez Amaro, received her PhD. In 2008 (University of Concepción – Chile) and her master degree in Materials Engineering in 1999 (University Simón Bolívar – Venezuela). In particular, in the recent years (CNR- Italy) Dr. Pérez Amaro are gained expertise in the chemical modification of 2D nanostructured additives, their dispersion in polymeric matrices and the assessment of the ultimate properties of the final nanocomposite obtained. Her expertise also include, thermo-mechanical modification of polymer blends and composites, assessment the biodegradability of biodegradable and bio-based polymers modified with different functional additives, dispersion of oxo additives in polyolefin and their blends with biodegradable polymers, chemical recycling of aromatic polyester, functionalization of polyolefin and the assessment of their properties for water treatment applications.

Abstract:

The LMPE Lab is an Italian SME ranked as a start-up/spin-off of the National Interuniversity Consortium of Materials Science and Technology (INSTM). It is located in the Technological Pole of the Capannori Town Hall at Segromigno in Monte (Lucca). The mission of LMPE, holding a consolidate scientific and technological background in polymers science and technology is aimed at implementing routes leading, within the framework of circular economy, to ZERO industrial waste processes or giving second safe life to the wastes generated in various industries of the district. The strategic approaches that will be applied in order to meet the objectives of clean industrial processes and utilize all the free energy content yet available in the wastes, will imply: 1) Design and production of environmentally friendly prototype polymeric formulations based on the wastes generated in the Capannori’s industrial district as raw materials and/or compatible fillers of biodegradable polymeric materials attained from fossil fuel feedstock as well as from agro industrial wastes. 2) In keeping with the expectations mentioned in the former point, attention will be posed onto full carbon backbone polymeric materials, holding an overall world market share higher than 50% in the production of relative short service life commodities. In particular, attention will be posed on the ways to impart to them propensity to biodegradation in different environmental compartments without compromising their eventual reutilization in recycling as second life raw material.

Speaker
Biography:

Denise Espinosa is Associate Professor of the Chemical Engineering Department of the University of São Paulo. She has expertise in Materials and Metallurgical Engineering with projects on e-waste recycling, extractive metallurgy and hydrometallurgy. The Laboratory of Recycling, Waste Treatment and Extraction (LAREX) is a research center in the University of São Paulo focused in the areas of recycling, metal extraction and solid waste treatment.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: The growth of photovoltaic (PV) technology has been addressed recently as a concern from a waste management point of view. The complexity of PV waste is often overlooked given the environmental benefits of the technology in terms of reduced greenhouse gas emissions. However, such wastes may contain metals that are highly hazardous for humans and the environment. Amorphous silicon (a-Si) PV modules employ indium-tin-oxide as transparent conductive oxide and its recovery could be advantageous from an economic perspective as well. Characterization studies covering flexible a-Si modules have not been published yet and hence this is the subject of this study. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: A flexible a-Si panel was subjected to thermal treatment to remove the proprietary, protective coating to allow SEM-EDS analysis. Different temperatures were used to identify when the coating would be released and what changes that temperature would bring in terms of layers of materials exposed. The module was then observed through a stereo microscope and SEM-EDS for investigation. TGA was also performed to identify possible organic content. Conclusion & Significance: Flexible amorphous solar modules are mainly comprised of metals. Steel is employed as backsheet, as noticed by iron and chromium in the SEM-EDS analysis. Germanium was identified, as expected, since a-SiGe is part of the semiconductor phase. Electrical contacts present were composed of copper and silver. Lastly, there was indium in the form of indium-tin-oxide as the transparent oxide conductor. All the materials identified are in accordance to production techniques described by manufacturers.

Speaker
Biography:

Professor of Invertebrate Zoology at the departmemt of Zoology,Faculty of Science,Cairo University, since 1993, Interested in the conservation of the freshwater ecosystem as regard pollution and biological control of snail vectors of parasitic diseases. Published more than 50 papers and planed and supervised more than 60 M Sc and Ph D thesis at the Cairo Universty.

Abstract:

The present study was conducted to assess the accumulation of some metals ( Fe, Cd, Cu, Pb, Mn, Mg, Ca and Zn) in the Nile water and sediment, at four sites (Gezyrat Al- Warrak [site I], Manial Sheeha [ site II], Al- Hawamdia [ site III] and Helwan [ site IV], as well as in the exoskeleton, hepatopancreas , muscles and gills of the crayfish Procambarus clarkii, collected from the same sites. The results obtained show that the different concentrations of the metals in the Nile water were in the descending order Mg>Zn>Fe>Cu>Mn>Pb>Cd, at all studied sites. Fe and Zn concentrations were higher than the permissible limits , while the remainder metals were within the allowable levels. Whereas, the concentrations of metals in the sediment showed different patterns according to their abundance in water. The abundance of these metals in the sediment was in the order Fe>Mg>Ca>Zn>Mn>Cu>Pb>Cd, at sites I and II, Fe>Mg>Ca>Zn>Mn>Cu>Cd>Pb, at site III and Mg>Fe>Ca>Zn>Mn>Cu>Cd>Pb, at site IV. Metal concentrations in the sediment were higher many folds than their values in the overlaying water. The bioconcentration factor ( BCF) of the metals in the exoskeleton and hepatopancreas of P. clarkii was in the descending order Fe>Mn>Cu>Mg>Zn>Ca>Cd>Pb. While, in the gills it was in the following arrangement Fe>Cu>Mn>Mg>Ca>Zn>Cd>Pb and in the muscles it was as follows: Fe>Cu>Mn>Mg>Ca>Zn>Cd>Pb. The concentration of the selected metals in the crayfish muscles were lower than the international permissible levels. Relative to the allowable limits for metals in foods, there was no sufficient accumulation of any of the detected metals to indicate that no significant health hazard would result from the consumption of the muscle parts of the animal. This study suggests also that P. clarkii may be used as bioindicator for trace metals pollution in the freshwater systems.

Speaker
Biography:

Alexandr G. Anshits graduated in chemistry at Novosibirsk State University (1971), has completed his PhD (1974) and Doctor of Chemistry (1992) in oxidation catalysis, Professor of physical chemistry (1994). Head of the laboratory catalytic conversion of small molecules (from1981), vice-director (from 2001) of the Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Technology SB RAS, Krasnoyarsk. Under his supervision, methods for the separation of pure ferrospheres and cenospheres from fly ashes were developed. The composition‒structure‒property relationship was established for ferrospheres and cenospheres over a wide range of variations in their chemical composition. Effective microspherical functional materials for various fields of applications (highly selective microspherical membrane materials for the production of high-purity helium and hydrogen, catalysts for oxidative coupling of methane, cracking of heavy oil components, sensitizers of emulsion explosives, and highly effective composite sorbents for long-term isolation of radionuclides in mineral-like forms) were developed.

Abstract:

The multicomponent composition of coal power plant fly ashes is a serious limitation in their bulk utilization. Cenospheres, are one of the microspherical components of fly ash, which are potentially suitable for the development of materials for different purposes. In recent years, new functional materials were developed based on a detailed characterization of narrow fractions of cenospheres with specific composition and structure. Among these materials are highly selective microspherical membrane materials for the production of high-purity helium and hydrogen, highly effective composite sorbents for long-term isolation of radionuclides in mineral-like forms, magnetically controlled encapsulated pH-sensitive spin probes for the examination of biological objects, and sensitizers of emulsion explosives capable of replacing hollow synthetic microspheres. One of the promising directions is using cenospheres as highly selective membrane materials for the production of high-purity helium and containers for storage and transportation of hydrogen. It was established that the permeability coefficients for the glass phase of cenosphere shells from different fly ashes are directly proportional to the content of the glass-forming oxide SiO2 in it. The experimental values of the permeability coefficients significantly exceed those for homogeneous silicate glasses for helium and hydrogen by a factor of 3‒24 and 12‒111, respectively. This fact can be explained by an essential difference between the states of two types of glass phases formed under substantially different conditions. The homogeneous glasses are formed under long-term annealing conditions at a constant temperature. Thin shells of the cenospheres have a fragmentary structure, which was formed as a result of the coalescence of molten microdroplets (1.0–2.5 μm) of an aluminosilicate precursor under conditions of high temperature gradients. The glass phase of the cenospheres thus formed differs significantly from the homogeneous glass phase, primarily, by the free-space geometry, which has a critical influence on the process of gas diffusion.

Paola Marini

Politecnico di Torino, Italy

Title: The recovery of the waste of the secondary glass (waste3)

Time : 15:20-15:45

Speaker
Biography:

Paola Marini has her expertise in raw material characterization and treatment process. Her research concerns the physical mechanical tests of the stone material, the durability of ornamental rocks; recognition and restoration of stone materials, protected designation of origin of the stones, mineral processing , identification of minerals and asbestos in particular, and the processes of recovery of secondary raw materials. Investigations are carried out on the stone materials and aggregates, magnetic separation tests in fluid medium, gravimetric, comminution etc., and analysis for the recognition of asbestos fibers in MCA, soil and rock.

Abstract:

In Italy, the amount of glass waste reached in 2015 1.825.000 t, and 91% of this amount has been recycled. The remaining 9% that is to say 164.000 t in 2015 constitutes the waste of this process (Coreve, 2015). SASIL spa processes this waste obtaining a product named glassy sand that is now well accepted by the glass factories. In turn from this treatment SASIL generates a 3% of waste made of all the impurities usually present in a glass waste. The problem faced in this research is the recovery of the most of these impurities. The impurities are represented by ceramics, stones, magnetic and non-magnetic metals, paper, plastics, cork, oily residues, synthetic corks etc., which are not always easily removable. SASIL S.p.A. already built a treatment plant for the recovery of this waste but the its performances are not yet satisfactory. For this reason some samples were taken from different points of the plant in order to carry out particle size analysis and product characterization to define the composition of the waste and evaluate the efficiency of industrial treatments. The present work shows that the cullet waste material of scrap glass recovery treatments (waste3) is composed of exploitable product fractions with different particle sizes and physical (such as density , shape and resistance) properties. In the next step, laboratory tests were executed to achieve maximum separation efficiency and to valorise the different product fractions. On the base of laboratory results, a new treatment plant was designed and economic evaluation have been made. The materials to be trade as secondary raw materials (SRM) are about 87.5% of the total entering the plant and result to be glass, plastic lightweight, ferrous metals, non-ferrous metals, synthetic stoppers and cork stoppers.

Speaker
Biography:

Nefise Erdincmer has graduated from Department of Biology of Hacettepe University. She started working at Environmental Measurements Laboratory of Dokuz Eylul University (DEU) as a Biologist. Besides, she obtained her Post-graduation in MSc from the Graduate School of Natural and Applied Sciences of DEU. Now she is pursuing her PhD in Marine Science and Technology Department in DEU.

Abstract:

The olive mill sector needs to put into practice new strategies for wastewater management that will reduce the environmental impact of its excessive water consumption and high dye and auxiliary chemical expenditures. The sector will be forced to develop an integrated waste management approach that involves the recycling of not only water but also consumable chemicals. Hydroxytyrosol is the main polyphenol naturally occurring in olive oil mill wastewater (OMW) either from two-phase or three-phase traditional and industrial mills. It is naturally occurring in virgin olive oil also in form of monoacetyl derivative which shows an antioxidant effect very close to the parent compound. Among the wide group of polyphenols, p-hydroxybenzoic acid and caffeic acid can be applied as natural antioxidant for cosmetic, food and pharmaceutical industries. In this study, the recoveries of the hydroxytyrosol, hydroxybenzoic acid and caffeic acid were performed using sequential anaerobic upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASB) and reverse ozmosis (RO) processes. After UASB treatment the effluent was acidified, filtered and vaporised at 30°C at a pressure of 1.7 A in an autoclave. The obtained oil was extracted with ethyl acetate. The hydroxytyrosol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid and caffeic acid were purified with kiesel gel containing silica-gel and they were measured in a HPLC in an isocratic media using acetonitril/acetic acid/water mixture at a flow rate of 1.2 ml/min. The final sequential RO membrane stages were carried out in a bench-scale cross-flow unit. Flat-sheet thin-film composite (TFC) RO consisted of a polyamide active layer on a polysulfone ultra-filtration support, with an active area of 200 cm2 was used for the reuse of treated water for process and land application since this treatment step maintaining the parametric values with regard to pH, EC, TSS, COD, total iron, ionic content and bacterial growth below the standard limits established for irrigation purposes.

Speaker
Biography:

Milorad Cirkovic was a Chief Engineer for two decades in the primary production of copper in RTB Bor. In the Mining and Metallurgy Institute, he works on the projects for development of technologies for recycling of the polymetallic scrap, electronic waste and environment protection. He is the author of more than 100 scientific papers and 3 patents.

Abstract:

Permanent development of technology causes creation of a significant amount of the secondary raw materials which are increasingly used as the raw material base for many metals. Due to the fact that large amounts of metal are concentrated in waste materials with their high content, a great attention is given to this subject and, numerous technologies are developed on the world stage today for recycling of this waste. Natural deposits of these metals are increasingly poorer so that the deposits of Cu-Zn alloys represent a significant potential for valuation the basic metals. This work presents the results of laboratory and pilot studies of brass decomposition in order to produce the basic metals (Cu and Zn) from brass scrap, because it is an important raw material base for production of these metals. The pilot plant consists of a rotary smelting furnace, capacity of 5 t, and special plant for gas treatment. The aim of this experiment was to remove zinc and accompanying metals by processing of these alloys and to produce copper. The produced copper has the following chemical composition: 99.03% Cu, 0.45% Zn, 0.46% Pb and 0.04% Sn. The amount of removed slag is 2-2.5% of the amount of charged material, and slag has the following chemical composition: 27.5% Cu, 38.92% Zn, 2.93% Fe, 6.03% SiO2 and 4.35% Cu (oxide).

Jonathan S Cramer

Fondation ParisTech, France

Title: Thermal Plasma Extractive Metallurgy: a proof of concept

Time : 16:50-17:15

Speaker
Biography:

Jonathan S. Cramer is a second year PhD student specialized in electrochemistry chemical engineering and material chemistry for applications in sustainable industries. During his Master studies he had the opportunity to work on topics such as: the durability of reinforced concrete building in the marine environment and the corrosion behaviour of hybrid aeronautic materials. Later on he focused on new alternative recycling processes destined to high value metallic wastes. Moreover, he worked as a research engineer on the set up of a molten salt electrochemical process for the recycling of super-alloys on end of life aircrafts. Now, as a PhD student, he investigates the implementation of a new thermal plasma process destined to the recycling of Waste Electrical & Electronic Equipment (WEEE).

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Recycling processes are now widely recognized as one of the solutions against the primary mineral resources supply risk. The most developed countries are aware of this issue and aim to find innovative processes to recycle strategical metallic elements. The existing processes are pyro and/or hydrometallurgical processes, however they may face significant drawbacks. Within the framework of alternative new recycling processes, we use the thermal plasma media to perform extractive metallurgy. Indeed, the so-called 4th state of matter combines the properties of hydro and pyro-metallurgical processes in addition to its particular properties. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: The selective extraction and recovery of desired metal in binary samples alloys (FeCu, CuSn) has been carried out by a 15kW enhanced plasma process. The enhancement lies in the modification (additives) and the control of the hot plasma chemical reactivity and temperature. The liquid alloy mass transport is also studied and controlled (by a DC bias) in order to understand the plasma-alloy interface and optimize the extraction. The extracted elements are transported by the plasma flow and recovered by condensation on a capture plate. Findings: The understanding and the control of the plasma-alloy interface led to the selective extraction of the desired elements with a high purity. Some plasma thermodynamic tools have been conceived to improve the selectivity and extraction rate. Multiple diagnosis tools (OES, LIBS, DRX, ICP…) are employed in-situ and ex-situ so that an extraction mechanism can be proposed. Conclusion & Significance: The thermal plasma is a suitable media for metallurgical processes. In this project we used a customizable and controllable thermal plasma process to selectively extract and recover metal from binary alloy (Cu,Sn…), with the further objective to recycle strategic metals from more diverse and complex matrices.

Md Abdul Jalil

Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Bangladesh

Title: Investigation of biogas generation from the waste of a vegetable and cattle market of Bangladesh
Speaker
Biography:

Md. Abdul Jalil is a Professor of Civil Engineering Department at Bangladesh University of Engineering & Technology (BUET), Dhaka, Bangladesh. He received his BSc in Civil Engineering in 1986 from BUET. He obtained his MSc in Civil Engineering in 1988 from the same university. He received his PhD in Civil Engineering in 1993 from Tokyo University, Japan under ADB Scholarship. He conducted Post-doctoral research on Water Management in Loughborough University, UK under Commonwealth Fellowship. He was appointed as a Lecturer in the Department of Civil Engineering of BUET in 1986. He was promoted to the post of Assistant Professor in 1989. He became Associate Professor in 1996 and Professor in 2001. He has published over 36 papers upto now. His current research areas are biogas generation from solid wastes, water and wastewater treatment technologies, and rain water harvesing. He also works as a Consultant and completed over 45 important national development projects.

Abstract:

The results of this study on the type and quantity of solid waste generated in a rural vegetable and cattle market, and biogas generation from the waste are presented in this paper. The market waste was collected; individual items were separated and measured on both normal days and haat days. During a normal day, it was found that very insignificant amount of waste was generated. But on a haat day, a large amount of waste was found to be generated. On an average, the amount of easily biodegradable waste was 589 kg out of the total waste of 1004 kg on a haat day. Cow dung, fish, ginger, cursed lobe, guava and banana leaves were the major biodegradable wastes. Other biodegradable wastes were goat dropping, bitter melon, pointed gourd, dhundul and brinjal. The total solids (TS) and volatile solids (VS) of the biodegradable portion of the market waste were determined and were found to be 17.94% and 13.87% respectively. Laboratory experiments were run order to generate biogas in anaerobic digesters using the same composition of the market waste. They were placed in a large closed chamber and room heaters were used to maintain the temperature of the chamber at a constant value. One set of batch experiments and another set of daily feed experiments were carried out. In the first set of experiments, 500 g and 750 g waste added in 2 digesters separately and inoculum was added to make the effective volume of 2.1 L for each digester. The experiments were operated for 46 days and the average temperature was found to be 34.7°C. In the second set of experiments, one digester was initially fed with 750 g waste having the effective volume of 2.2 L. Another twochambers (connected in series) digester was initially fed with 750 g waste having the effective volume of 3 L. Then the daily feed was 18.75 g waste mixed with 20 mL of water with dispensing 40 mL slurry from the digester. The experiments were run for 40 days and the average temperature was 35.1°C. The results of the 1st set of experiments revealed that the daily biogas generation rates were 0.22 and 0.48 m3/m3 of digester volume for the concentrations of waste as 0.238 and 0.357 kg/L respectively for 40 days retention time, and the respective rates of biogas producton were 0.30 and 0.40 m3/kg of VS added. The results of the 2nd set of experments revealed that the daily production of biogas was 0.44 and 0.37 m3/m3 of the digester volume for the one-chamber digester and two-chamber digester respectively. But in terms of per kg VS added, the average daily gas generation rates were 0.185 m3 and 0.212 m3 for the respective digesters.

Saliha zerdoum

Environnement Développement Durable -ALGERIE

Title: Transition and quality control of wastewater uses Recycled in Algeria

Time : 17:40-18:05

Speaker
Biography:

I am an engineer and expert in environment and sustainable development. During my 20-year career, I have been involved in all aspects of administrative and technical management of environmental issues in my area. I first started in the administrative sector, where I had the chance to be involved in the development projects development and management program. I have not only witnessed the advancement of development towards modern facilities such as technical landfills, recycling and composting facilities, and wastewater recycling, but it also gave me the opportunity Learn more and develop my own skills.

Abstract:

Algeria is in the category of poor water resources according to the scarcity threshold set by the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) or the World Bank at 1,000 cubic meters per capita per year. It is currently estimated at 500 m3 and will be only 430 m3 in 2020, according to projections made by the UN. (Source MRE). So she can not turn the Back to this Opportunity and reuse this purified or naturally purified wastewater considering these COMMITMENTS OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT. Algeria has all the keys to a successful transition and to control the quality of wastewater uses. It is necessary to recognize that scientific knowledge helps in the integrated and sustainable management Scientifically "To each use of the water its adapted source. Gout Ideal! Ideal for Health, Ideal for Soil, Ideal for Finished Product Cheap and sustinabl Assured. The "ideal drop" is the guarantee for each context of an optimal and specific technology (expected quality and quantity of water, storage, irrigation mode ...). It must also lead to economic and social profitability while preserving risks to health, agronomy and the environment. Treating water excessively kills the profitability of agricultural projects. Conversely, poor control of the risks would lead to failures jeopardizing the future of the reuse of Domestic wastewater. The reflection on treatment must be carried out from the downstream of the water chain and the water must be treated according to the use that is made of it. Irrigators and water caterers are then obliged to work in synergy and seek the best compromise, ideal gout and share best the benefits.

Hisham Sherif

Egyptian Company for Solid waste recycling ( ECARU), Egypt

Title: Alternative solid fuel projects in Egypt current status and future prospects

Time : 18:05-18:30

Speaker
Biography:

Prior to heading Tawazon, a core unit of Qalaa Holding, an African leader in infrastructure and industry, Dr. Hisham Sherif was the CEO of Engineering Tasks Group (ENTAG) and the Egyptian Company for Solid Waste Recycling (ECARU). He led both companies — which are now subsidiaries of Tawazon — in Biomass management projects (collection, transportation and treatment) for producing Biomass derived fuel (BDF), animal feed, and compost. Dr. Sherif previously served as a lecturer in the Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering of Minya University. As a leading expert in local and international procurement laws and procedures governing licensing, imports and joint ventures he assisted over 30 municipalities in nine countries in upgrading MSW treatment and disposal projects. Furthermore, he helped direct planning, construction and operation of new MSW sorting, composting, and production of refused derived fuel (RDF) and landfilling projects across the region. He has attended numerous national and international conferences in the field of municipal solid waste, biomass, alternative fuel and energy management and technologies. Dr. Sherif holds Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from the Chemical Engineering Department at Minya University, and a PhD in Chemical Engineering, jointly supervised by Minya University and Strathclyde University in Glasgow, Scotland.

Abstract:

Speaker
Biography:

M Sulyman was born in 1976. He got his MSc. degree in 2008 from Academy of Graduate Studies and the B.Sc. degree in 2000 from Al-Mergheb University in the field of chemical engineering in Libya. Currently he is a PhD student at Polymer Technology Department, Gdansk University of Technology in Poland. His interests of research are environmental and polymer engineering. His main research is asphalt polymer blend using polymer waste materials. Additional interest work is wastewater treatment using green adsorbents prepared from agricultural by-products/wastes

Abstract:

Presently, oil spill pollution is still one of the important issues worldwide, due to their environmental and economic issues. It also remains a challenge to the environment scientists and technologist. Currently, there are many superior oil recovering materials in the market. However, because they are costly and cannot be recycled repeatedly, the emergency oil recovery operation at oil spills has its own oil-saturated wastes that require expensive post-treatment, adding tremendous cost to the oil recovery process. So, the use of potential and low cost, as well as an environment friendly sorbents instead of conventional adsorbent material is still necessary. Nowadays, natural and synthetic sorbents are applied for oil spill cleanup due to their availability, rapid and cost saving characteristics, eco-friendliness and reduced environmental effects, which are one of the main challenges in commercial manufacturing. However, there are several works that have been conducted to use natural and synthetic adsorbent materials such as kenaf fiber, sugarcane bagasse, crumb rubber, polyurethane foam, polypropylene fiber and silica nanopowder, in the removal of oils from water-oil system. In this study, recycled textile fiber obtained from used tires (TF) has been selected as low cost adsorbent for oily wastewater treatment using static system. Crude oil and used corn oil were selected as a model of petroleum and non-petroleum oils, respectively. The effect of operational parameter such as contact time and sorbent dose on the sorption capacity and oil removal efficiency during sorption system were investigated. The evaluation of sorbent efficiency for only oil uptake, which is called “dry system”, was also studied. Compressed textile fiber using mechanical de-vulcanization method to remove oil from the layer oil system was also studied using oil layer bath. From analytical point of view, each experiment was performed three times under the same conditions and the average results were taken. Based upon the experimental results of this study, following results are obtained: The maximum adsorption capacity and removal percentage for 1 g sorbent in 50 ml water containing 4.62 g of used cooking oil and crude oil using 150 ml glass beakers were found to be 4.33 g/g and 94% for cooking oil, and 4.5 g/g and 97.4% for crude oil respectively at sorption temperature of 5oC; adsorption capacity for dry system was also evaluated for both oils and maximum adsorption capacity was obtained about 17 g/g for used cooking oil, and 25.7 g/g for crude oil which reached duration of 72 hr; regeneration results of the fiber sorbent showed that reuse of recycled textile fiber for three times is possible without a reduction in oil sorption capability; although the compressed TF showed less sorption capacity than uncompressed fiber, but also showed that it could be used for the storage and transport of recovered oil and the adsorbed oil does not leaches out at room temperature; and finally, the results also indicate that TF can be used without activation and any chemical previous treatment for oil spill cleanup.