Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 4th World Congress and Expo on Recycling Rome, Italy.

Day 2 :

Recycling Expo-2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Kunio Yoshikawa  photo
Biography:

Kunio Yoshikawa was born in 1953 in Tokyo, Japan. He is a professor of Tokyo Institute of Technology and an associate editor of Applied Energy. His bachelor, master and doctor degrees were awarded from Tokyo Institute of Technology. His major fields are energy conversion, waste management and environmental engineering. He has been working in Tokyo Institute of Technology for more than 38 years as a research associate, an associate professor and a professor. He has published nearly 200 journal papers with the major award of AIAA Best Paper Award, ASME James Harry Potter Gold Medal, JSME Environmental Technology Achievement Award and Best Educator Award of Tokyo Institute of Technology.

Abstract:

Up to now, the only commercialized ways of municipal solid waste (MSW) treatment are mass land-filling and mass burning. In Japan, most of burnable wastes are incinerated, but not in other countries, and still land-filling is the most popular way of waste treatment all over the world. But the world recent trend is to prohibit or limit land-filling of wastes while citizens do not want to increase waste incineration in developed countries as well as developing countries. On the other hand, major part of the world is discharging non-segregated municipal solid wastes. Thus we have to find out the utilization ways alternative to incineration for non-segregated MSW. Pre-treatment of wastes requires crushing, drying and deodorizing, which are normally different processes. But we have developed innovative hydrothermal treatment technology (HTT) which can perform these three pre-treatment functions in one process utilizing high pressure saturated steam. Figure 1 shows the operating principle of HTT. Non-segregated MSW are fed into the reactor, and then, 220℃, 2.5MPa saturated steam is supplied into the reactor for about 30 minutes and the blades installed inside the reactor rotates to mix MSW and steam for about 10 minutes. Then the product is discharged after extracting steam. The product is powder-like substance and the moisture content is almost the same as the raw material, but is easily dried by natural drying. The inert material such as metal, glass and stones can be easily sieved out after drying. There is almost no bad smell in the solid products, and the products can be used as solid fuels which can be easily mixed with coal for power generation or cement production. Only 10-15% of the product is enough for steam production in a boiler. HTT has already commercialized in Japan, China and Indonesia.

Recycling Expo-2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Maria VISA photo
Biography:

Graduated in chemistry and physics at University “Babes -Bolyai”, Romania. was manager at College of Natural Sciences “Emil Racovita”, Brasov. PhD. Diploma at Transilvania University on waste materials used for wastewater treatment. Vicepresident of Chemistry Society Romania, branch Brasov. Researcher on materials zeolites, fly ash used for removal dyes, heavy metals and surfactants from wastewater. Interculturale experience with Europen countries was developed on Erasmus and Comemius projects. 34 papers published in ISI journals with FI>2. (h index=11) in Adsorption, Catalysis Today, Applied Surface Science, Hazardous Materials Journals and 5 books and got more than 8 of awards given by National Authority for Scientific Research from Romania for the highly research in new materials obtained from fly ash. I participated in many International Conferences (WOCA, FOA10, the 10th International Conference on Fundamentals of Adsorption, 2010, 2011 Moscow, SPEA Palermo, Valentia 2012, 2nd International Congress on Advanced Materials 2013, China, 8th NANOSMAT, 2013, Granada 2013 Manchester UK, Urban Environmental Pollution Conference, 2014, Toronto, Fall Meeting Warsaw and more

Abstract:

This work is focused on fly ash –material with adsorption properties used for advanced wastewater treatment, aiming at simultaneous removal of complex pollutant. There are gradually analysed substrates containing fly ash, modified fly ash by step–wise decreasing the alkali concentration down to 0.1N, alone or combined with natural adsorbents (bentonite, diatomite) and with photocatalysts (TiO2, WO3). Previous results were presented when using TiO2-photocatalyst and FA[1], and a comparative discussion is further developed in systems also containing WO3. Removal of pollutants like dyes with a complex structure (azo-, antrachinone, metal-complex dyes), heavy metals cations, surfactants from wastewater was investigated by adsorption and photodegradation onto a lot of substrates[2]. The materials obtained from FA and WO3, TiO2, used in removing pollutants from wastewater [2,3]. Materials zeolite obtained from FA are an excellent adsorbent for heavy metals[4]. New materials obtained from FA and surfactants as template were investigated for advance removal pollutants. The removal processes are investigated in dark (adsorption) and under UV illumination (adsorption + photocatalysis) in systems containing: (a) a single dye (Bemacid Blau; (b) one reactive dye or Bemacid Rot with Cu2+; (c) Mhetylen Bleu or Methyl Orange with Cu2+, Cd2+ and mixtures of two dyes (BB+BR) and Cu2+. Tests were done in batch experiments, under stirring. The dye specific uptake by adsorption-photodegradation depends on the fly ash, the ratio FA-NaOH:TiO2, FA-NaOH:WO3, the dye type, the initial concentration of dye, the pH value in the system, the contact time, the mass of substrate. All these parameters are investigated and the otpimised results are presented. The fly ash – wide band gap semiconductor systems develop two simultaneous processes: photodegradation and adsorption and the results are presented when treating wastewaters loaded with dyes, heavy metals, surfactants; the results show these combinations as a viable, low cost and up-scalable and sustainable technology.

Keynote Forum

Aeslina Abdul Kadir

University Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, Malaysia

Keynote: Wastes Recycling Into Fired Clay Bricks: A Review
Recycling Expo-2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Aeslina Abdul Kadir photo
Biography:

Aeslina Abdul Kadir was born in Batu Pahat, Johor, Malaysia, on 21st of July 1980. Graduated with B.Sc. with honours in Environmental Science at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) in 2002 followed by M.Eng. in Civil Engineering at University Teknologi Malaysia (UTM) in 2004 and PhD in Civil Engineering at RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia (2010). Her expertise is in solid waste management and solid waste recycling into building material. She had published more than 50 publications including proceedings, journals, books and modules. In addition, her passion in research has enable her to secure almost 2 million worth of grants. Assoc. Prof. Dr. Aeslina binti Abdul Kadir also is a member of International Water Association (IWA), International Solid Waste Association (ISWA), Malaysian Society of Waste Management and Environment (MSWME), Malaysian Society for Engineering and Technology (mySET), Concrete Society of Malaysia (CSM) and Malaysian Research and Innovation Society (MyRIS).

Abstract:

Brick is one of the most common masonry units used as building material. Due to the demand, different types of waste have been investigated to be incorporated into fired clay brick for example sludge wastes, agricultural wastes, fly ash, fuel wastes and other wastes. Previous investigations have demonstrated positive effects on the physical and mechanical properties such as lightweight bricks with improved shrinkage, porosity and strength. However, reduced performances in number of cases were also demonstrated. In addition, the high temperature in the firing process allows volatilization of dangerous components through emissions, changes the chemical characteristics of the material and eliminates the toxic components through fixation process. Therefore, this alternative disposal method for the waste may provide sustainable method to immobilise toxic chemicals that pose a very high risk to the environment through either leaching or emissions as well as providing a new construction product with improved properties providing the mix is appropriately designed and prepared for the required properties.

  • Track 09: Agricultural Waste Recycling | Track 12: Circulatory Economy | Track 02: E-waste Management | Track 11: Metal and Plastic Recycling| Track 13: Recycling Market
Speaker
Biography:

Muscolo Adele graduated in Biological Sciences (MSc), has completed her PhD in Food Science at the age of 26 years at the Policlinic Federico II University of Naples, Italy. In 1988 she started is professional carrier as researcher at “Mediterranea” University of Reggio Calabria where she is still working as Full Professor in soil chemistry and ecology. Since 1990 she is reviewer for International Scientific Journals and since 2008 she is evaluator of projects for European Community, International Funding Research Agencies and Italian and Foreign Research Ministeries. She is chair of many Regional, National and International research projects.. She is examiner of international PhD dissertation. She published more than 180 papers in international journals with IF and has been serving as an editorial board member of many International Journals. She is Associate Editor for JFR.

Abstract:

In recent years, research is increasingly oriented towards the use of agronomic techniques to improve the productivity in terms of quantity and quality of products, promoting the conservation of natural resources, protecting the soil resource and reducing the environmental impact. In Mediterranean area, crop production is suffering mainly for the loss of soil fertility and the consequent massive use of expensive macro- and micro-nutrient inputs for which agriculture is almost totally dependent on imported products or on fertilizers produced with expensive industrial processes, which generates greenhouse gases (GHGs). In view of the above considerations, this study was conducted to determine the chemical characteristics of six composts obtained with organic wastes from different sources. The fertilizer power was assessed on soil and plant. Waste characteristics influenced the chemical properties of the compost much more than composting process. The obtained compost had a positive effects on soil with an increase in soil organic matter, nutrients, MBC, and bacterial and fungal population that differed in respect to compost features. The best result on soil, was obtained by using the compost produced with a mix of broadleaf vegetables. Regarding crop productivity, the data showed a specificity between crop and type of compost used.

Gary Leeke

Cranfield University, UK

Title: Adding Value to Mixed Waste Plastic
Speaker
Biography:

Leeke is Chair in Chemical Engineering and Head of the Bioenergy and Resource Management Centre at Cranfield University, UK. His research interests lie in the areas of recycling enabling technologies and resource efficiency. He has expertise in high pressure engineering and thermo-chemical processing, specifically in reaction engineering, separation technology, flow reactors, and their applications to polymer/composite processing and remanufacture, mixed plastic waste and the circular economy.  He leads the EXHUME project in the UK  investigating the deconstruction of fibre reinforced composites. Gary sits on the Composites Leadership Forum Sustainability Working Group for Composites UK.

Abstract:

Plastic is notoriously difficult to recycle – if plastic packaging is considered only 14% is collected for recycling, and only 5% of material value is retained for subsequent use. Plastics that are recycled tend to be down-cycled and are not recyclable after use. Other routes include incineration or landfilling.  Situations are made worse by the high cost of collection and the lack of recycling plants that deal with them. Globally, it is estimated that 32% of plastics are not collected and escape into natural systems. If a position of resource efficiency is adopted, solutions are needed to process waste plastic so that value added products can be obtained. These would ease the strain on landfill sites, and produce an output that could be sold at profit. 

 

A solution proposed by Recycling Technologies Ltd (RT) is to convert end-of-life mixed plastic into a substitute crude oil that can be used as a source of valuable hydrocarbons.  Challenges arise from the heterogeneity of feedstock that has variable composition and impurities such as water and biomass. A number of products can potentially result, in particular naphtha which can be used as a polymer feedstock to produce new materials, and therefore helping to address the circular economy issue around plastic waste.  Other products include heavy fuel oil which has the advantage of being Ultra Low Sulphur [S<0.02%]), gas-oil and other tailored products. The presentation highlights the pyrolysis technology developed by RT and some of the challenges to convert end-of-life mixed plastic into value-added hydrocarbon products.

Speaker
Biography:

Zhao Xueyong has been engaged in desertification research since 1987 and carried out research and demonstration of techniques for sustainable desertification reversion and resource use for promoting poverty relief in Horqin Sandy Land of Inner-Mongolia, which is an agro-pastoral transitional region experienced severe desertification in the period of 1950-1980s and reversion since 1990s, but challenged by reduction of water availability and stagnated economic growth. Due to his contribution to combating desertification and poverty relief, he is granted with "Award for successful Saving the Dryland" by UNEP and "Award for Promoting Science and Technology Development" by the Ministry of Science and Technology of China and Inner-Mongolia Government.

Abstract:

The agro-pastoral transitional zone in northern China refers to a region along the isohyets line of 380 mm annual precipitation in northern China and covers about 8.5*105 km2 and a transitional zone from nomadic land use to growingly intensified cropping land use. In the past 50 years, this region went through a severe desertification period from 1950s-1980s mainly due to cropland invasion and over-grazing driven by population increase. Since early 1990, desertification has been reversed, however, the reversion rate has been decreased and water availability reduced, characterized by lake shrinkage, river drying-up and underground water table reduction. As a result, natural and planted trees and bushes of large area died of drought and came into a challenge to land restoration and local economic development. Therefore, there come to a common consensus that promotion of recycling material use, including water and organic matter from agro-pastoral activities, for degraded land restoration and economic development in the agro-pastoral transitional zone. Since 2011, a series of experiment have been carried out on selection of fiber decomposers, techniques for fast decomposition of organic matter of stalks, manures and residues after animal feeding, mixed with sand and/or bentonite for re-production of animal feeding, granulate organic fertilizer and soil ameliorant, etc.. Eight decomposers of fungi were cultured for fast decomposition of organic matter, and a trial production line was industrialized for producing semi-fermented livestock feedings, organic fertilizer, and organic mixture for shifting sand fixation and soil improvement (photo 1). The trial production line is of a capacity to produce organic mixture to successfully fix 200 ha of shifting sand dunes and animal feedings of 50-60 t annually. It is expected that this technique will be fully developed and utilized in a larger scale for desertified land restoration and employment of more labors.

Speaker
Biography:

Masayuki HOJITO is a professor of Kitasato Univsersity, Towada, Aomori, Japan. His scientific career over 30 years has been based on Soil Science. He is coordinating the University Farm: The Yakumo Experimental Farm is located in southern Hokkaido and it is a unique practical farm, which has established a self-sufficient resource-recycling system. Fertilizers, chemicals or feeds from outside are completely restricted. The farm produces the Kitasato Yakumo Beef (with a Registered trade name) that is the first certified organic beef in Japan. The crucial factor in this process is the management of white clover. Chemical fertilizers are not used and only well-composted cow manure is applied onto the clover-mixed grasslands. Utilizing this method it has been demonstrated that organic and safe beef can be produced using a 370-hectare natural ecosystem without causing any environmental pollution. In essence this system demonstrates that solar energy produces beef.

Abstract:

Nutrient recycling should be effective at balancing nutrient flows in Japanese animal production. This means replacing imported feed with self-produced feed. The Yakumo Experimental Farm of Kitasato University has produced commercial beef under “organic” management, without the use of agricultural chemicals or imported feed, since 2005. Using a dataset obtained from 220 ha of grassland and 250 head of cattle over the 5 years from 2008 to 2012, we estimated nitrogen (N) flow. During 2011 and 2012, we measured grass production, cattle production (selling out), soil parameters, and atmospheric deposition (from precipitation and atmospheric ammonia concentrations). To determine N fixation by clover, we compared grass + clover plots with grass-only plots. Averaged over the period, N components on the 220 ha of grassland comprised 1952 Mg soil N stock, 3.2 Mg N yr−1 in living livestock, 14.3 Mg N yr−1 uptake by grass growth (including 8.6 Mg yr−1 of N fixed by clover), 15.7 Mg N yr−1 applied in composted manure, 1.7 Mg N yr−1 in imported bedding material, 2.8 Mg N yr−1 in deposition, and 1.41 Mg N yr−1 in meat production. N in composted manure equaled about 0.8% of the huge soil N stock; N in grass production equaled about 0.7%, of which clover fixation supplied 60%; N deposition was not negligible; and N export by meat production was minor. These results show that on this organically managed farm, soil N stock increased gradually (by 8.6 Mg N yr−1 [220 ha]−1 = 39 kg N ha−1 yr−1 = 0.44% of the soil N stock) and N export was small. Our findings show that it is possible to balance N inputs with N outputs in a beef cattle enterprise without the need for feed or fertilizers 

Speaker
Biography:

Ing. Lucía Pérez Amaro, PhD. has her expertise in Polymeric Materials Science and Technology. Dr. Perez Amaro, received her PhD. In 2008 (University of Concepción – Chile) and her master degree in Materials Engineering in 1999 (University Simón Bolívar – Venezuela). In particular, in the recent years (CNR- Italy) Dr. Pérez Amaro are gained expertise in the chemical modification of 2D nanostructured additives, their dispersion in polymeric matrices and the assessment of the ultimate properties of the final nanocomposite obtained. Her expertise also include, thermo-mechanical modification of polymer blends and composites, assessment the biodegradability of biodegradable and bio-based polymers modified with different functional additives, dispersion of oxo additives in polyolefin and their blends with biodegradable polymers, chemical recycling of aromatic polyester, functionalization of polyolefin and the assessment of their properties for water treatment applications.

Abstract:

The LMPE Lab is an Italian SME ranked as a start-up/spin-off of the National Interuniversity Consortium of Materials Science and Technology (INSTM). It is located in the Technological Pole of the Capannori Town Hall at Segromigno in Monte (Lucca). The mission of LMPE, holding a consolidate scientific and technological background in polymers science and technology is aimed at implementing routes leading, within the framework of circular economy, to ZERO industrial waste processes or giving second safe life to the wastes generated in various industries of the district. The strategic approaches that will be applied in order to meet the objectives of clean industrial processes and utilize all the free energy content yet available in the wastes, will imply: 1) Design and production of environmentally friendly prototype polymeric formulations based on the wastes generated in the Capannori’s industrial district as raw materials and/or compatible fillers of biodegradable polymeric materials attained from fossil fuel feedstock as well as from agro industrial wastes. 2) In keeping with the expectations mentioned in the former point, attention will be posed onto full carbon backbone polymeric materials, holding an overall world market share higher than 50% in the production of relative short service life commodities. In particular, attention will be posed on the ways to impart to them propensity to biodegradation in different environmental compartments without compromising their eventual reutilization in recycling as second life raw material.

Speaker
Biography:

Katie Patrick is an AustralianAmerican environmental engineer, designer and computer programmer. Her company, Hello World Labs creates datadriven, gamification and behaviorchange solutions to the world’s biggest problems. She is the creator of the behavior change game and Youtube channel Detrashed, the author of Detrash Your Life in 90 Days The Art of Zero Waste Living and the creator of Zerowastify an app designed to better measure municipal solid waste. Katie has been a media spokesperson on environmental issues and has been featured regularly on TV, radio and in print publications including Vogue Australia. She was CEO of the VCfunded greenlifestyle magazine Green Pages Australia and was appointed environmental brand ambassador by the Ogilvy Earth advertising agency for Volkswagen, Lipton Tea and Wolfblass Wines. She has served on the board of Australia’s national eco label, Good Environmental Choice Australia, and won the Cosmopolitan Woman of the Year Award for entrepreneurship. After graduating from the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology with a B.Eng in Environmental Engineering, she worked as an environmental design engineer for building engineers Lincoln Scott in Sydney on some of the world’s first platinumLEEDcertified commercial buildings. Katie lives in San Francisco with her 15monthold daughter Anastasia.

Abstract:

You may have heard the saying, “If you can’t measure it, it probably doesn’t exist.” This talk is about measuring what we want to change and getting really good at changing it. Simply disclosing data has enormous potential to catalyze change. We will peek into the surge in new data being collected in smart cities by satellites, drones and sensors, and the exciting start ups using this data for environmental change. We will ask the questions “What are you measuring and how are you measuring it?” and “What will this future world look like when you have have achieved your goal?” I will reveal the surprising power of behaviorchange and gamification techniques like using pledges, leaderboards, awards, progress bars and smileys. I will show how to use these features as parts of a feedback loop of real environmental data, exploiting the c oncept of agency (motivation) in game design. This will lead to the overarching principle of cybernetic ecology, in which a feedback loop exchanges information between nature and machines. I teach a practical howto of communitybased social marketing, based on the principle of social diffusion, and why it is essential to incorporate narrative design when selling sustainable behaviors. My talk will end with fun ideas we can

Speaker
Biography:

Li Guangming has completed his PhD at the age of 27 years from East China Institute of Chemical Technology. He is Professor of College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University. He has published more than 100 papers in environmental science and technology and has been serving as the Water and Environmet Journal editorial board membership.

Abstract:

Since 21 centruy waste electric and eletronic equipment (WEEE) has appeared into public concerning as wel as sustainable development concepts has been accepted by public communities. Environmental issues and resouring benefits from WEEE have promoted to improve management system and innovation technology. In order to deal with the illegal imports of WEEE, China has promulgated many laws and regulations to restrict and prohibit the import of WEEE, including multilateral environmental agreements. After that, the relevant policies and regulations on the management and processing of WEEE have been formulated in accordance with the national conditions in China. On July 1, 2012, China has issued the Management Regulation of Collection and Use of the WEEE Disposal Fund to support the enterprises which have obtained the qualification of a WEEE disposal enterprise for recovering WEEE. At present, The well-established domestic WEEE recycling and resource processing enterprises are generally equipped with the automatic television dismantling line, cathode ray tube (CRT) hot blast system, non-metallic powder regeneration system, precious-metal electrolytic recycling system, cartridges resource recycling system, printed circle board (PCB) seperation system, computer dismantling line, automatic refrigerator dismantling line, air conditioner dismantling line, foam compressor, washing machine dismantling line, etc. Some new technologies for smart phones, lithium ion batteries and liquid crystal display panels (LCD) recovery have been developing. Ecodesign, urban mining and intergrated interprises for minmum environment impact in production and consumption of electric and electronic equipment has been concerned.

Speaker
Biography:

Denise Espinosa is Associate Professor of the Chemical Engineering Department of the University of São Paulo. She has expertise in Materials and Metallurgical Engineering with projects on e-waste recycling, extractive metallurgy and hydrometallurgy. The Laboratory of Recycling, Waste Treatment and Extraction (LAREX) is a research center in the University of São Paulo focused in the areas of recycling, metal extraction and solid waste treatment.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: The growth of photovoltaic (PV) technology has been addressed recently as a concern from a waste management point of view. The complexity of PV waste is often overlooked given the environmental benefits of the technology in terms of reduced greenhouse gas emissions. However, such wastes may contain metals that are highly hazardous for humans and the environment. Amorphous silicon (a-Si) PV modules employ indium-tin-oxide as transparent conductive oxide and its recovery could be advantageous from an economic perspective as well. Characterization studies covering flexible a-Si modules have not been published yet and hence this is the subject of this study. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: A flexible a-Si panel was subjected to thermal treatment to remove the proprietary, protective coating to allow SEM-EDS analysis. Different temperatures were used to identify when the coating would be released and what changes that temperature would bring in terms of layers of materials exposed. The module was then observed through a stereo microscope and SEM-EDS for investigation. TGA was also performed to identify possible organic content. Conclusion & Significance: Flexible amorphous solar modules are mainly comprised of metals. Steel is employed as backsheet, as noticed by iron and chromium in the SEM-EDS analysis. Germanium was identified, as expected, since a-SiGe is part of the semiconductor phase. Electrical contacts present were composed of copper and silver. Lastly, there was indium in the form of indium-tin-oxide as the transparent oxide conductor. All the materials identified are in accordance to production techniques described by manufacturers.

Speaker
Biography:

Pravin Kannan completed his PhD from Tennessee Technological University, USA and is currently a Research Associate at The Petroleum Institute in Abu Dhabi. His main research interests includes Waste management, Kinetic modeling, Multi-scale modeling of transport processes using Cellular Automata, Semiconductor wafer processing, and polymer degradation. He has published numerous articles in reputed journals and has been serving as a reviewer for many international journals

Abstract:

Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process was originally developed for producing synthetic petroleum substitute from coal and liquid fuels. Carbonaceous materials, like plastics can be considered a potential feedstock resource for synthetic fuel production. The molar ratio of H2:CO should be closer to 2 in the FT feedstock in order to achieve maximum yield of product alkanes. The objective of this work is to investigate conversion of waste plastics into synthesis gas with composition and properties suitable for Fischer Tropsch applications. The product gas composition depends on a variety of factors including waste composition, gasification temperature, and composition of the gasification medium (CO2 and steam blends). The goal is to optimize these parameters such that the product gas meets the above mentioned specifications for FT synthesis. A thermodynamic model developed earlier in Aspen Plus for steam gasification of LDPE [] was extended to include mixture of different plastics (oxygenated and non-oxygenated) and gasifying medium blends. The gasifier was modeled as a Gibbs free reactor and the simulation was performed at isothermal conditions of 700, 900 and 1100 ˚C. Preliminary results analyzed at carbon boundary point indicate favorable process conditions for producing syngas and complete carbon conversion. A sensitivity analysis on the process parameters would be also presented and discussed.

Jorge Loredo

University of Oviedo, Spain

Title: Mining wastes in a circular economy
Speaker
Biography:

Jorge Loredo is Doctor Mining Engineer by the University of Oviedo (Spain) and Mining Geologist by Paris School of Mines (France). Has his expertise in mining wastes and environmental assessment in abandoned mine sites. Currently is Professor at the Department of Mining Exploration and Exploitation of the University of Oviedo (Spain). He has been Leader researcher in national and international research projects in the field of mining wastes assessment and management.

Abstract:

It is universally accepted by companies and administrations that the development of the extractive industry must be made in equilibria with the protection and conservation of the environment. Currently, a compromise between the exploitation of the mineral resources and the environmental protection is possible and this compromise must be reached in the framework of the applicable existing normative, taking into account the particularities of the mining activities themselves. In this context, the compromise between the exploitation of the mineral resources and the environmental protection must be contemplated by the inclusion of the environmental aspects into the all phases of the project, from the initial prospective phase to the closure phase at the end of the life of the mine, applying designs and preventive measures or in other case corrective impact measures, and incorporating to the project the environmental recuperation of the lands at the end of the project life. In this industry, the most important affections to the environment are associated to the mining wastes, then, the current philosophy in this matter is based in the principles of prevention, hierarchy, responsibility and application of the best available techniques, in order to diminish the wastes generation, to decrease the content in dangerous substances and to facilitate the recycling and valorisation of the generated wastes, by the transition to a more circular economy, where the products, the materials and the resources maintain long time in the productive cycle and the wastes generation will be reduced in origen.

Speaker
Biography:

Jonathan S. Cramer is a second year PhD student specialized in electrochemistry chemical engineering and material chemistry for applications in sustainable industries. During his Master studies he had the opportunity to work on topics such as: the durability of reinforced concrete building in the marine environment and the corrosion behaviour of hybrid aeronautic materials. Later on he focused on new alternative recycling processes destined to high value metallic wastes. Moreover, he worked as a research engineer on the set up of a molten salt electrochemical process for the recycling of super-alloys on end of life aircrafts. Now, as a PhD student, he investigates the implementation of a new thermal plasma process destined to the recycling of Waste Electrical & Electronic Equipment (WEEE).

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Recycling processes are now widely recognized as one of the solutions against the primary mineral resources supply risk. The most developed countries are aware of this issue and aim to find innovative processes to recycle strategical metallic elements. The existing processes are pyro and/or hydrometallurgical processes, however they may face significant drawbacks. Within the framework of alternative new recycling processes, we use the thermal plasma media to perform extractive metallurgy. Indeed, the so-called 4th state of matter combines the properties of hydro and pyro-metallurgical processes in addition to its particular properties. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: The selective extraction and recovery of desired metal in binary samples alloys (FeCu, CuSn) has been carried out by a 15kW enhanced plasma process. The enhancement lies in the modification (additives) and the control of the hot plasma chemical reactivity and temperature. The liquid alloy mass transport is also studied and controlled (by a DC bias) in order to understand the plasma-alloy interface and optimize the extraction. The extracted elements are transported by the plasma flow and recovered by condensation on a capture plate. Findings: The understanding and the control of the plasma-alloy interface led to the selective extraction of the desired elements with a high purity. Some plasma thermodynamic tools have been conceived to improve the selectivity and extraction rate. Multiple diagnosis tools (OES, LIBS, DRX, ICP…) are employed in-situ and ex-situ so that an extraction mechanism can be proposed. Conclusion & Significance: The thermal plasma is a suitable media for metallurgical processes. In this project we used a customizable and controllable thermal plasma process to selectively extract and recover metal from binary alloy (Cu,Sn…), with the further objective to recycle strategic metals from more diverse and complex matrices.

Speaker
Biography:

Zahra Balador, PhD student of architecture. She has received bachelor of architectural engineering from Ferdowsi University of Mashhad in 2010, Master of Energy and Architecture from University of Tehran in 2015. Also she has been the Energy consultant and designer at University of Tehran Civil and Architecture Home, Lecturer of building energy analysis soft wares in the Academy of Architecture institute, Researcher at Office of Sustainability of Amirkabir University, Head of the energy community in the Institute of young architects and urban designers, Lecturer of undergraduate courses, University of Applied Science and technology, Tehran, She passed the Internship at UN-Habitat, United Nations Human Settlements Program. She has working Experience in Architectural Companies and the membership of many architectural and sustainable societies such as Generation Zero, Plastic Diet, Iranian Architecture Center Institute, Academy of Architecture Institute, Arch House Institute, Construction Engineering Organization of Tehran, Office of Sustainability, Amirkabir University of Technology.

Abstract:

Building insulation material as a building element will play a role in the building energy performance and the environmental footprints, since the building envelop greatly have influence on the energy efficiency of the building. The growing need for sustainable materials has urged researchers to find some insulation materials as well as other building materials which have lower burden on the environment, e.g. natural, or recycled materials. Some of the building materials which are in their early stage are building insulations made from agricultural by-products, because they are biodegradable, sustainable and recyclable. There are some examples such as Kenauf which are in the competitive market. But there is a long way for the other alternatives of bio-based insulation materials to go to the market, because their characteristics are not known completely yet. This study aims to show which parts of their characteristics and behaviors need more attention and further research to make these alternatives more reliable and competitive, and change this idea that insulations are always petrochemical materials. This study by reviewing the literature and classifying the researches on the unconventional insulation materials into different categories, e.g. thermal, acoustical, structural, environmental behaviors, will reveal the hotspots of this procedure, and make further researches in this field easier.

Speaker
Biography:

Diego Piazza has graduation at Tecnologia em Polímeros from Universidade de Caxias do Sul (2007), master's at Engenharia e Ciência dos Materiais from Universidade de Caxias do Sul (2011) and doctorate at Engineering from Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (2016). He is currently professor mestre (assistente) nível ii at Universidade de Caxias do Sul. He is currently a professor at the University of Caxias do Sul and has held the position of coordinator of the Polymer Technology Undergraduate Course at UCS from 2011 to 2016. He works in the field of polymer nanocomposites, coatings, materials recycling and the processing of polymeric materials by Injection, extrusion, thermoforming and rotomoulding. Participates in the UCS Entrepreneurship program. Integrates the group of researchers with The Ocean Cleanup (Holland) in the study of degradation and recovery of polymers from the marine environment. He has experience in the area of project development and research in the field of materials science and engineering, with emphasis on polymers, polymer materials processing, polymer nanocomposites, organic coatings, intelligent inks, powder paints, and materials recycling.

Abstract:

One of the major environmental problems is the issue of the contamination of marine fauna and flora. Animals are prone to death by strangulation when trying to feed, involuntarily, on polymer waste present in this environment1. Most of the plastic debris present on the coast has its origin on the inappropriate disposal2. This work aims at studying and developing a methodology for the recycling of polymers present in coastal ecosystems, comparing their properties with commercial polymers. The polymers used in the development of this work were collected at the beach of Torres/Brazil with the help of the Praia Limpa Torres team, in September, 2015. 169.0 kg of waste were collected, from which 20.8 were polymers. The presence of higher amounts of PE and PP is highlighted. After clean and dried, they were ground in a knife mill. The resulting product had an average particle size distribution of 20 mm and was separated according to different densities. Afterwards the polymers were extruded in a single-screw extruder at the temperature profile of 170/185/200°C for PE and obtained by injection, and then submitted to the flexural strength (ASTM D790), and melt flow index (performed under 190°C, 5Kg and 20s for PE; 230°C, 2.16 kg and 10s UCS; Grupo Brinox/Coza; Praia Limpa/Brazil. for PP) tests.

Speaker
Biography:

Sunjung Kim currently works as a professor in the School of Materials Science and Engineering in the University of Ulsan, Korea. He has expertise in the application of electrochemistry theories and experiments to various industrial fields including urban mining, mining resources development, secondary battery, microelectronics, optoelectronics etc. He obtained a M.S. and a Ph.D. from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in USA after receiving a B.S. from Seoul National University in Korea. He has 4-year working experience in Samsung Electronics and LG Electronics before joining the faculty of the University of Ulsan in 2008.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Research on the recovery of heavy metals in rare earth element (REE) mine wastewater and the treatment of harmful substances have been actively carried out in order to reduce environmental pollutions and generate valuable REE-based resources. However, studies on electrolytic REE recovery directly from REE mine wastewater are very lacking because the content of REE metals contained in the wastewater is considerably low compared with its process cost and more importantly it is known that REE ions are very difficult to be electrochemically reduced to REE metals due to very low redox potentials. Findings: In this study, we propose a high-efficiency, low-cost REE recovery technology from REE mine wastewater, which is being developed using the principle of electrolytic recovery in an aqueous solution. Electrowinning of erbium (Er), ytterbium (Yb) and thulium (Tm) among REEs was studied using acidic chloride solutions, and the influence of its process parameters on the chemical composition and metallurgical phases of reduced REE-based deposits was also investigated.

Speaker
Biography:

Diego Piazza has graduation at Tecnologia em Polímeros from Universidade de Caxias do Sul (2007), master's at Engenharia e Ciência dos Materiais from Universidade de Caxias do Sul (2011) and doctorate at Engineering from Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (2016). He is currently professor mestre (assistente) nível ii at Universidade de Caxias do Sul. He is currently a professor at the University of Caxias do Sul and has held the position of coordinator of the Polymer Technology Undergraduate Course at UCS from 2011 to 2016. He works in the field of polymer nanocomposites, coatings, materials recycling and the processing of polymeric materials by Injection, extrusion, thermoforming and rotomoulding. Participates in the UCS Entrepreneurship program. Integrates the group of researchers with The Ocean Cleanup (Holland) in the study of degradation and recovery of polymers from the marine environment. He has experience in the area of project development and research in the field of materials science and engineering, with emphasis on polymers, polymer materials processing, polymer nanocomposites, organic coatings, intelligent inks, powder paints, and materials recycling.

Abstract:

PLA and PLA with triacetin (5wt%) and buriti fiber (30wt%) designed as PLA/B/T were extruded in a single-screw extruder. The product was milled, dried and compression molded in a press for 60 seconds, at 180°C to prepare test specimens with dimensions 200 mm x 100 mm and 1 mm thickness. The simulated marine environment used is provided with 7 lamps (250W) simulating ultraviolet rays. Withdrawal of samples was performed after 15, 30, 45, 60, 100 and 600 days of exposure. The morphological characterization of the sample surface was performed in a SEM. Analyses of chemical changes were monitored by FTIR, on prepared films by the KBr pellet method, in the wave number range of 4000 to 400 cm-1. Lactic acid index (ILA) was calculated as the ratio between band surfaces A1 (3200 cm-1) and A2 (750 cm-1), which is considered a PLA band.

Speaker
Biography:

Lavee holds a PhD in Public Economics from the Ben-Gurion University, an MA in Economics and an MBA in Business Administration and Economics from the Hebrew University. Prof. Lavee is a member of the Department of Economics and Management at Tel-Hai Academic College. He also serves as a partner and general manager of Pareto Group Ltd. He is a well-known expert with over 22 years of experience in economic and environmental consulting, financial advisory and strategic consulting in various fields, including issues related to economic efficiency and the periphery. He has extensive experience in managing complex projects and large-scale environmental economic consulting and conducting projects for the public and government sectors, including government ministries, local authorities, government corporations and public agencies

Abstract:

Demand uncertainty may be a significant barrier for firms to enter the market. This study suggests that an establishment of a monopole which absorbs demand uncertainty by commitment to determine a long-term stable price, may be efficient by reducing the uncertainty level. An economic model examines the social welfare consequences of establishing such a monopsony in the waste recycling market in Israel. The model provides a good description of many other markets with high entry cost and price volatility. The results show that an establishment of a monopsony in the waste recycling market could be an efficient process from a social welfare perspective (welfare increasing); this depends on the market's uncertainty level and the technological changes resulting from eliminating uncertainty. In the case study shown in Israel, creating a regulation that allows larger municipalities to sell the waste at competitive prices (international market prices) and allows small municipalities to recycle at a monopsony price, will lead to improved social welfare. The novelty of this study stems from the proof that a monopsony may increase the market size in markets with high levels of uncertainty, thus increasing the consumers benefit. A monopsony creates "certainty benefits" by reducing the risk premium arising from price fluctuations and the entrance of new players, and although it gains excessive profits, the benefit of reducing uncertainty may be greater than the loss of a monopolistic exploitation.

Muhammad Rusdy

Hasanuddin University, Indonesia

Title: Banana (Musa sp) Wastes as Ruminant Feed
Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Banana is a traditional plant cultivated for its fruit. After harvesting, the remaining plant parts, i.e. pseudo-stem, leaf and fruit peel that consisting of around 80% can be used as feed for ruminants, as they contain high amounts of nutrients. The highest crude protein content of banana wastes is found in the leaf, followed by fruit peel and pseudo-stem. Both banana pseudo-stem and leaf contain moderate amounts of fiber but are higher than that of banana peel. The high contents of tannin in the leaf and fruit peel reduced their protein and dry matter digestibility and their value as ruminants. The low crude protein and high moisture contents of pseudo-stem reduced dry matter intake potential by ruminants. Due to the low digestibility of leaf and fruit peel and the low dry matter and crude protein contents of stem, to obtain high animal production from ruminants fed banana wastes, it should be supplemented with proteinaceous and carbonaceous concentrate feeds

Muhammad J Munir

Mirpur University of Science and Technology, Pakistan

Title: Mitigation of alkali silica reaction using waste rice husk ash in concrete
Speaker
Biography:

Engr. Muhammad Junaid Munir has completed his MSc Structural Engineering from University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore. His main research is focused on the durability of concrete especially alkali silica reaction. He has published eleven (11) research papers in well reputed peer reviewed local and international journals, coordinated several national research projects and has been serving as Junior Lecturer at Mirpur University of Science and Technology, AJK, Pakistan.

Abstract:

Alkali silica reaction (ASR) is considered as the cancer of concrete. In this study, waste rice husk ash (RHA) was utilized to control ASR expansion in concrete. For this purpose, RHA was collected from local brick industry. To develop the phenomena of ASR, local reactive aggregates were used. To evaluate the ASR potential, mortar bar specimens with different RHA dosages (10%, 20%, 30% and 40% by cement weight) were prepared following ASTM C1260. Strength activity index test was performed to investigate the pozzolanic reactivity of RHA. Results showed that RHA was a pozzolanic material. For specimens incorporating 10% and 40% RHA, reduction in mortar bar expansion was observed 21% and 46%, respectively. Low calcium to silica ratio with higher alumina content was observed in mortar bar specimens during energy disperse X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis, which resulted into dilution process and alkali absorption. On the basis of results, it can be concluded that RHA (10%-40% in replacement of cement) can be utilized to control ASR expansion through pozzolanic reaction.