Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 4th World Congress and Expo on Recycling Rome, Italy.

Day 3 :

Recycling Expo-2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Nour-Eddine MENAD photo
Biography:

Nour-Eddine Menad has completed his PhD from National School of geology of Nancy (France) and worked as Associate Professor at Technical University of Lulea (Sweden). He is scientific expert on process development on recycling of industrial wastes. He has published more than 100 papers in reputed journals and conferences, 4 patents and is in the board committee of Edorium Journal of Waste Management. At the moment, he is working at BRGM (Bureau de recherché Géologique et minière) on development of separation techniques applied on the urban mine to recover stratégic metals.

Abstract:

Automotive Shredder Residues (ASR) is a by-product generated during the shredding of End-of-Life Vehicles (ELV) hulks, and further refined in Post-Shredder lines of Treatment (PST). European legislations impose 95% of recycling rate of ELV with 10% of energy recovery. Current recycling rate of ASR requires development of innovative processing for treating certain fractions generated from PST which are landfilled. The use of plastics-rich streams as combustible and/or alternative reducing agent in metallurgical furnaces is an industrial challenge. The whole objective of the presented work is therefore to assess the possibility of using the fractions rich in plastics in metallurgical furnaces as reducing agents. This would provide cast-iron manufacturers with chemical agents cheaper than coke. As additional potential benefits, the amount of CO2 generated in the processes and the volume of landfilled shredding residues would be lowered. This paper describes the results of chemical and mineralogical characteristics of plastics contained in ASR using multi-technical tools. Thereafter, the results of sink-float processing for the selective separation of plastics are given. The process consists in screening and developing sink-float separation techniques. About 2 tons of plastics were sieved to 4 mm. The fraction less than 4 mm representing 2.5 wt% of the total weight are eliminated. These products are essentially fluff, wood etc... The fraction higher than 4 mm representing about 712 kg are treated by the sink-float separation technique in a dense media prepared with barite (BaSO4) having a density of 1.34. The products obtained (floating and sinking) are dried, weighed and analysed. The results show that the floated fraction is well purified (it contains less than 0.5% Cl2) and can be used in metallurgical furnaces. This investigation is a good example demonstrating the efficiency of the mineral processing techniques for wastes separation and recycling.

Keynote Forum

Semiat R

Israel Institute of Technology, Israel

Keynote: Water treatments needs and directions
Recycling Expo-2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Semiat R photo
Biography:

Raphael Semiat is a professor in the Chemical Engineering Department, Technion, Haifa, Israel. He holds the Yitzhak Rabin Memorial Chair in Science, engineering and management, served as the director of the Grand Water research Institute and is in charge of the Rabin Desalination Laboratory. B.Sc. degree in Chemical Engineering from the Technion in 1973 and D.Sc. dissertation on MED Desalination in 1978 at the Technion. Expert in separation processes with industrial experience. He joined the Chemical Engineering Department, Technion, in 1990. His main research interests are: Process Development; Separation Processes with emphasis on Desalination. Of particular relevance are the research subjects associated with membranes processes and membrane fouling prevention. Most of his current research subjects are associated with the industry.

Abstract:

The challenges in water management are among the most important problems facing the world today. The shortage of clean water is at the heart of critical health issues in developing countries and is the focus of ecological and safety concerns even for the highly developed nations. To adequately provide water for drinking and agriculture, we must desalinate and clean natural water sources, reclaim polluted water, purify water with different degrees of contaminants and improve the effectiveness of water handling (storage and delivery) systems ranging from desalination plants to waste water treatment facilities and to home water purification systems. We must remove contaminants that include inorganics (metals and ions), organics (e.g. toxic waste, pharmaceuticals) and microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, etc.). At the heart of these diverse problems stands the need for new ways to clean water, to safely dispose of the extracted waste, to properly reuse the cleaning systems and to keep the environment clean. Israel made significant steps to provide affordable solutions, based on wide distribution system, desalination (close to 80% of the urban water consumption), Tertiary treatment of wastewater for irrigation, drip irrigation for reduction of water consumption and improved agriculture techniques. However, there is always place for improvements. The directions may include improved membranes, improved desalination steps in order to reduce the cost, improve pretreatment processes, increased recoveries (near zero liquid discharge in brackish water desalination), increase product quality, improved wastewater treatment by better techniques like MBR and MBBR, better treatment for removal of tracers of organic contaminants, treatment of polluted aquifers, develop small water treatment and recovery for remote locations, reduce water losses on the piping systems and more.

  • Track 07: Chemical Waste Recovery | Track 08: Food Waste Recycling | Track 20: Glass Recycling| Track 06: Industrial Waste Recycling| Track 03: Solid Waste Management

Session Introduction

Paola Marini

Politecnico di Torino, Italy

Title: The recovery of the waste of the secondary glass (waste3)
Speaker
Biography:

Paola Marini has her expertise in raw material characterization and treatment process. Her research concerns the physical mechanical tests of the stone material, the durability of ornamental rocks; recognition and restoration of stone materials, protected designation of origin of the stones, mineral processing , identification of minerals and asbestos in particular, and the processes of recovery of secondary raw materials. Investigations are carried out on the stone materials and aggregates, magnetic separation tests in fluid medium, gravimetric, comminution etc., and analysis for the recognition of asbestos fibers in MCA, soil and rock.

Abstract:

In Italy, the amount of glass waste reached in 2015 1.825.000 t, and 91% of this amount has been recycled. The remaining 9% that is to say 164.000 t in 2015 constitutes the waste of this process (Coreve, 2015). SASIL spa processes this waste obtaining a product named glassy sand that is now well accepted by the glass factories. In turn from this treatment SASIL generates a 3% of waste made of all the impurities usually present in a glass waste. The problem faced in this research is the recovery of the most of these impurities. The impurities are represented by ceramics, stones, magnetic and non-magnetic metals, paper, plastics, cork, oily residues, synthetic corks etc., which are not always easily removable. SASIL S.p.A. already built a treatment plant for the recovery of this waste but the its performances are not yet satisfactory. For this reason some samples were taken from different points of the plant in order to carry out particle size analysis and product characterization to define the composition of the waste and evaluate the efficiency of industrial treatments. The present work shows that the cullet waste material of scrap glass recovery treatments (waste3) is composed of exploitable product fractions with different particle sizes and physical (such as density , shape and resistance) properties. In the next step, laboratory tests were executed to achieve maximum separation efficiency and to valorise the different product fractions. On the base of laboratory results, a new treatment plant was designed and economic evaluation have been made. The materials to be trade as secondary raw materials (SRM) are about 87.5% of the total entering the plant and result to be glass, plastic lightweight, ferrous metals, non-ferrous metals, synthetic stoppers and cork stoppers.

Speaker
Biography:

Awf Al-Kassir, male, Professor Industrial Engineer, (Ph.D.) from Valladolid University in 1995, graduated (B.Sc.) from mechanical engineering department, Mosul University in 1978. He worked for University of Technology of Baghdad in 1979 and Institute of Technology of Ramady 1980-1988 after getting his (M.Sc.). From 1989-1994, he worked as a researcher and associate professor at the University of Valladolid in Spain. From 1995 up to date he worked as a professor at the University of Extremadura in Spain. He was invited professor at TUBITAK research center of Turkey during the academic year 2009-2010. Also he is the coordinator of Master Bioenergy Subject & lecturer at the Polytechnique Institute of Portalegre in Portugal, 2010-2012. Now he has published more than 150 papers and contributed more than 80 communications to congresses & other books. He participated in national research projects, he was a member of ASHRAE from 1989-1995, he was accepted for colligate in the engineering college of Spain since 1990.

Abstract:

Biomass residues with more than 50% moisture content cause operational problems of combustors and reduce efficiency. Also, higher moisture contents lead to high CO and volatile organic compound emissions, mainly in smaller combustion units. Using dry biomass in a combustion systems results in lower emissions, reduced fuel use, improved boiler efficiency, increased heat production, reduced ancillary power requirements. The main purpose of the drying process is to reduce moisture content of the wet biomass. The choice of dryers will depend on the characteristics of the wet biomass material, the source of heat and the integration options available. The heat sources and temperatures for drying are important considerations. Flue gas is an efficient source of the heat. A method of calculation for thermal drying has been developed for the design of a direct contact dryer for biomass residues. A heat source of dryer will be flue gasses of the existing biomass boiler. The model input data are inlet temperatures and the flow rates of gas and biomass residues. An experimental facility has been developed and built in order to measure the temperatures inside the dryer along time. The results obtained indicated that an optimal dryer length of approximately 0.95m has been calculated for an inner diameter of 0.13m. The gasification of biomass for energy production purpose leads to minor CO2 emissions. In the gasification experiments of biomass 10 g of vine shoot were treated at three temperatures (650, 750 & 800ºC) in air atmosphere. Once the optimal temperature (800ºC) was selected, the wine shoot remnants were gasified by using an air stream of 200 ml/min and different residence times (8 and 50 minutes, respectively). In our case, the total amount of vine shoots produced yearly in Extremadura reaches 87725 Tons, so a volume of 1.91*107 m3 of H2 may be obtained annually. Multiplying by its Lower Heating Value, yields to H2 energy potential of 205766 GJ per year. Keeping in mind Doubling's Law, a total power of 30.01 MW could be obtained. Considering a yield of 21% for the solid phase obtained in the gasification process. The energy potential of the carbons could be obtained by multiplying by its HHV.

MEAR Francois O

Lille 1 University, France

Title: CRT Glass Recycling
Speaker
Biography:

Francois O. Méar has completed his PhD at the age of 29 years from Montpellier II University and postdoctoral studies from Cambridge and Tohoku University. He is assistant professor at Lille I University and specifically in the Catalysis and Solid State Chemistry Unit. FOM is working on the formulation of glass matrices for unconventional applications (e.g. containment matrices for nuclear waste, seals glass for SOFC) and on the synthesis of self-healing glassy matrices. He has published more than 35 papers in reputed journals, 1 patent and 2 book chapters.

Abstract:

The amount of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) or e-waste generated in the world is growing rapidly. The content of hazardous components in electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) is a major concern during the waste management phase. Ideally, the materials in electronic products should be re-used when the products reach the end of their lifetime. In the European Union (EU), WEEE represents about 7.5 million tons each year, where computer monitors and TV sets containing cathode-ray tubes (CRTs) represent about 80% of the total electronic waste. In the United States, it is estimated that 300,000 tons of e-waste ended up in landfills in 2000 and CRTs represent about one-third of electronics waste tonnage. The three kinds of glass constituting the CRT monitor contain hazardous and heavy elements (lead, strontium, antimony, barium, europium, selenium etc.) and weigh between 50% and 85% of the total weight of a computer monitor or a television set. Currently, collected monitors are dismantled and treated, and the CRT glass generally ends up in a special landfill licensed for hazardous waste. Hence, in Europe almost all of them are in landfills. As the lead content in these waste products represents as much as 80% of the toxic metals in discard electronics, CRTs represent a clear potential pollution danger to the environment. To investigate the potential applications of waste CRT glass, characterizations of these materials need to be carried out. Waste CRT glass can be classified as being part of either color or black & white monitors, and by their manufacturer. However, at this stage only general CRT glass composition and properties are available, as no systematic studies have been carried out by manufacturers. Several studies have been carried out to investigate how the waste CRT glass could be re-used. CRT glass should be recycled in a closed-loop system (i.e. in the manufacture of new CRTs glass) or an open-loop system (i.e. the glass is used in other outlets).

Speaker
Biography:

M. Sulyman was born in 1976. He got his MSc. degree in 2008 from Academy of Graduate Studies and the B.Sc. degree in 2000 from Al-Mergheb University in the field of chemical engineering in Libya. Currently he is a PhD student at Polymer Technology Department, Gdansk University of Technology in Poland. His interests of research are environmental and polymer engineering. His main research is asphalt polymer blend using polymer waste materials. Additional interest work is wastewater treatment using green adsorbents prepared from agricultural by-products/wastes

Abstract:

Up to now, oil spill pollution is still one of the important issues all over the world, due to its environmental and economical issues. It also, remains a challenge to the environment scientists and technologists. Nowadays, removing of petroleum and nonpetroleum spills by adsorbent materials is the most safety and effective process. However, there are several works that have been conducted on using natural and synthetic adsorbent materials such as kenaf fiber, sugarcane bagasse, crumb rubber, polyurethane foam, polypropylene fiber raw wool and cotton, and silica nanopowder, in the removal of oils from water-oil system. In this study, recycled textile fiber (TF) obtained from used tires has been selected and used as a low cost and recycled adsorbent for petroleum and non-petroleum oily wastewater treatment using the static and dynamic systems. The effect of duration, contact time, and fiber dose on the oil sorption capacity and removal percentage during static system sorption were investigated and maximum adsorption capacity and removal percentage for 1 g TF in 50 ml water containing 4.62 g of oil using 150 ml glass beakers were found to be 4.33 g/g and 94% for cooking oil , and 4.10 g/g and 88.74 % for crude oil respectively at room temperature. The evaluation of sorbent efficiency for only oil uptake which called “dry system” was also studied and the maximum adsorption capacity was obtained about 17 g/g for used cooking oil, and 14.4 g/g for crude oil which reached duration 24 hr . Compressed textile fiber using physical technique to removal oil from the layer oil system was also studied using static system. At the dynamic system, the following results are obtained: the sorption removal of oil from water-oil system was still almost constant until breakpoint was reached, which was 99%and 98.5% for used cooking oil and crude oil respectively, while the sorption capacity at breakpoint was found to be 7.53g/g and 6.5g/g for cooking oil and crude oil respectively with flow rate of 20 ml/min. The column having an ID of about 25 mm, with fiber mass of 2 g, influent initial concentration of 9.06 g/100 ml, and flow rate 20 ml/min could treat 2000 ml and 1840 ml of cooking oily wastewater and crude oily wastewater respectively at breakpoint. Although the compressed TF showed lower sorption capacity than uncompressed fiber which about 2.35 g/g. But at the same time, the compressed TF showed that could be used for the storage and transport of recovered oil and the adsorbed oil not leaches out at room temperature for long time. These results also indicated that textile fiber obtained from used tires can be used without activation and any previous chemical treatment for oil spill cleanup.

Speaker
Biography:

Fernando Gabriel is a Professor of the Physics Department and of the Graduate programm in Materials Science of the Federal University of Ouro Preto and the Director of the Department of Research in Engineering and Continuing Education of the Gorceix Foundation. He graduated in Physics, has a Master’s Degree in Physical Metallurgy, a Ph.D. in Materials Science, with a post-doc in hydrothermal growth and a post-doc in recycling. His work is today is largely focused on materials characterization, geometallurgy, materials processing and clean production

Abstract:

Steatite, commonly known as soapstone, is a rock of metamorphic origin, which has talc, a phillosilicate of hydrated magnesium, as its main component. The uses of soapstone are as natural stones for countertops, vanities, flooring and entryways, but the main applications are related to high temperatura uses, as fireplaces, stove countertops and kitchenware, besides its vast use in art, for the production of scultures. In Brazil, Minas Gerais state is by far the largest producer of soapstone and it has tradition both in exporting plates and blocks of the material to the whole world, and in producing sculptures and art in soapstone, since the collonial times, in the XVII Century. One oustanding fact is that the statue of Christ the Redeemer, one of the most famous symbols of Brazil, is covered with a soapstone layer. The processing of soapstone for the production of blocks and plates involves basically cutting by abrasion, and operation that, in the case of plates, results in a volume of rejects of up to 20% of the volume of production, consisting of fine grained soapstone. The aim of this work is to find a destination for this type of reject, as the use of tailings for the synthesis of new materials is a worldwide trend today. This paper approaches the utilization of tailings of soapstone (steatite) in order to produce ceramics. The experiments involved chemical, mineralogical and granulometric characterization of the rejects, followed by the production of ceramics with sopstone rejects additions, and the determination of the mechanical properties of the ceramics and their colors. The results show that the addition of soapstone in a ratio over 20% in the ceramic mass can enhance the bending resistance of the ceramic samples when they are fired at temperatures in excess of 900°C.

Speaker
Biography:

R. Galhano dos Santos has graduated in Chemistry at the Faculty of Sciences of the Classical University of Lisbon in 2006, where he obtained his PhD in Organic Chemistry in the following years. During his PhD studies he has integrated the Group of Raw Materials of CERENA, where, simultaneously, with his PhD studies developed and deepened his knowledge and scientific activity in the area of polymers and in the up-cycling of wastes/residues to access value-added products. This work allowed him to develop and gain the awareness for the necessity of the development of tools to improve the health and wellbeing of all living beings as well the environment of the entire globe. Within this context his current work has been focused in the use of direct liquefaction of biomass for the production of bio-oil to access to chemical platforms in alternatives to those overcoming from fossil sources. Such studies have resulted in the publication of several papers and patents over the last years

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Being a hot topic, although not a great news to anyone, the great dependence of mankind on petroleum sources has been, over the last few decades, becoming more than an inconvenient, a problem that eagers to be solved and overcome. Humanity, in general, is aware of the adverse effects that the fossil sources have caused to the environment. Alternatives to such sources have been envisaged and outlined. Still limited solutions to overcome those issues were identified. The scientific community have focused much of their attention on biorefineries. This latter concept aims to basically to achieve three major objectives, the production of bioenergy, biofuels, and biochemicals

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: One of the processes among those that can be explored under the concept of biorefineries is the direct liquefaction of lignocellulosic biomass catalyzed by acids. This process has been widely studied and applied to several sources biomasses. The lignocellulosic biomass is considered to be source of products with high chemical interest.

Findings: The studies conducted have shown that liquefaction can lead to bio-oils that have proven to possess very good anti-oxidant activity, to be used as carbohydrate building block for synthesis or fermentation processes, bio-fuels, chemicals platform. The direct liquefaction has been applied to a wide range of raw materials and all of them has been successfully liquefied by optimizing the reaction conditions.

Conclusion & Significance: The results to be presented demonstrate that liquefactions could be, in fact, an effective tool to access products with chemical interest as well as bio-fuels. Alongside, wastes and residues can be this way mitigated contributing, thus, to a better environment towards the up-cycling of feedstocks that have no economic value and would end-up to be burnt without any valorization what-so-ever increasing the glasshouse effect, causing, therefore, more damage to the environment.

Speaker
Biography:

Judith Buchmaier has studied technical chemistry and biotechnologies. She is now working on thermal separation technologies. Her expertise lies in different applications of membrane distillation. Her studies include membrane stability tests, test cell experiments such as execution of experiments in pilot scale. Among other applications such as ammonia recovery from biogas sludge, waste water treatment with membrane distillation one focus area lies in the optimization and recovery of valuable substances in galvanizing and printed circuit board industry

Abstract:

In the electroplating industry there are processing steps which are very energy- and resource- intensive. An example is the rinsing of the products after the electroplating or etching bath. This can be done directly above the bath or in a separate basin. The rinsing leads on the one hand to the necessity of concentrating the electroplating or etching bath. On the other hand the rinsing water has to be treated in a way, that the electroplating substances are concentrated and can be returned to the bath and furthermore can be “cleaned” of the electro-plating substances for reusing it as water. Within the scope of this work the capability of the membrane distillation as application for the waste water treatment in the electroplating industry was tested. In order to analyze the membrane distillation under realistic operating conditions, experiments were carried out at a membrane distillation plant installed at an electroplating company. During the experiments, the operational capability of the membrane distillation for use in treatment of electroplating liquids was tested in a first step. Furthermore experiments for reaching required concentrations of bath ingredients were conducted. All in all the experimental investigation showed the feasibility of treating electroplating liquids through membrane distillation. Through the experiments the electroplating substances were concentrated and the fresh rinsing water was prepared for reusing it in the rinsing bath.

Speaker
Biography:

Delia T. SPONZA is professor since 2001 in Environmental Engineering Department at Dokuz Eylul University – IZMIR TURKEY. She is member of Turkish Science Academy since 2013. She is studying with anaerobic, aerobic, advanced treatment processes of industrial wastewaters. She has more than 15 studies relevant to toxicities of industrial wastewater. M.Sc. Gokce Guney has been graduated from Engineering Faculty of Dokuz Eylul University, Turkey as an Environmental Engineer. Then she started working at Environmental Engineering Department of Dokuz Eylul University, Turkey as a research assistant. Later on she obtained her post-graduation in M.Sc. from The Graduate School of Natural and Applied Sciences of Dokuz Eylul University, Turkey from Environmental Engineering Department. Now, she has continued her Ph.D. in Environmental Engineering Department and M.Sc. in Occupational Health and Safety Department both at The Graduate School of Natural and Applied Sciences of Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkey. M.Sc. Nefise Erdincmer has been graduated from Department of Biology of Hacettepe University. Then she started working at Environmental Measurements Laboratory of Dokuz Eylul University (DEU) as a biologist. Besides she obtained her post-graduation in M.Sc. from The Graduate School of Natural and Applied Sciences of DEU. Now she has continued her Ph.D in Marine Science and Technology Department in DEU.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: The olive mill sector needs to put into practice new strategies for wastewater management that will reduce the environmental impact of its excessive water consumption and high dye and auxiliary chemical expenditures The sector will be forced to develop an integrated waste management approach that involves the recycling of not only water but also consumable chemicals. Hydroxytyrosol is the main polyphenol naturally occurring in olive oil mill wastewater (OMW) either from two-phase or three-phase traditional and industrial mills. It is naturally occurring in virgin olive oil also in form of monoacetyl derivative which shows an antioxidant effect very close to the parent compound. Among the wide group of polyphenols, p-hydroxybenzoic acid and caffeic acid can be applied as natural antioxidant for cosmetic, food and pharmaceutical industries. In this study, the recoveries of the hydroxytyrosol, hydroxybenzoic acid and caffeic acid were performed using sequential anaerobic upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASB) and reverse ozmosis (RO) processes. After UASB treatment the effluent was asidified, filtered and vaporised at 30 ⁰C at a pressure of 1.7 A in a autoclave. The obtained oil was extracted with ethyl acetate. The Hydroxytyrosol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid and caffeic acid were purified with kieselgel containing silica-gel and they were measured in a HPLC in a isocratic media using acetonitril/acettic acid/water mixture flow rate of 1.2 ml/min. The final sequential RO membrane stages were carried out in a bench-scale cross-flow unit. Flat-sheet thin-film composite (TFC) RO consisted of a polyamide active layer on a polysulfone ultra-filtration support, with an active area of 200 cm2 was used for reuse the treated water for process and land application since this treatment step maintaining the parametric values with regard to pH, EC, TSS, COD, total iron, ionic content and bacterial growth below the standard limits established for irrigation purposes.

Ji Hye Jo

Korea Environment Institute (KEI), South Korea

Title: Safe Management Strategies of Nanowastes in South Korea
Speaker
Biography:

Ji Hye Jo is a research fellow at Korea Environment Institute, the Korea’s leading think tank on environmental policy and environmental impact assessment (EIA) sponsored by Korean government. Her major was a biological hydrogen energy production. Recently, her research interest includes sustainable resource circulation and waste management policy. She focuses on efficient waste-to-energy, recycling of rare metals and safe management of hazardous wastes such as medical wastes.

Abstract:

With the rapid development of nanotechnology, the use of nanomaterials has increased sharply in various industrial, medical and environmental sectors. A considerable amount of nanomaterials have been discharged in the form of nanowastes in manufacturing plants or laboratories, or after being used by consumers. Concerns over the safety risks of these nanomaterials or nanoproducts to human health have also been continuously raised. In South Korea, the world's third largest producer of nano-goods, there are little data about how nanowastes are exposed to the environment and discharged. In case nanowastes are recycled, nanoparticles containing dust are discharged in the crushing process and released, having negative effects on workers’ health and the environment. Sludges and ashes generated during wastewater treatment and incineration, respectively, end up in landfills and are discharged back into the environment as secondary nanowastes. In this study, we examined the behavior of nanomaterials based on the material flow analysis applied from the major sources of nanowastes to the final landfill through waste treatment facilities. We analyzed the management system and issues by estimating the flows of well-known nanomaterials (n-TiO2, n-ZnO, n-Ag, CNT) with focus on waste incineration process (scenario I~III).  According to scenario III which reflects the domestic waste treatment rates, about 48 tons of n-TiO2 and 178 tons of n-ZnO would be discarded to the landfill per year after incineration. In case of n-Ag, a relatively small amount would be produced, among which 7 tons could be processed in incinerators. While around 1 ton of carbon nanotubes would be incinerated, around 99% are estimated to be removed after combustion.In conclusion, other nanomaterials except CNT would not be removed in the incineration process and end up in landfill sites, leading to prediction that a small amount of nanomaterials or less than 0.04% would be emitted into the atmosphere.

Speaker
Biography:

W.-G. Jung have had experience as a researcher at POSCO before he moved to Kookmin University, Korea. His major research areas are steelmaking process, chemical metallurgy, thermodynamics and related topics. His recent researches are mainly focused on the recycling of materials including metals, engineering ceramic compounds and industrial wastes

Abstract:

A large amount of slag is generated in the steel product production process. In general, it is known that about 300 kg of blast furnace slag is produced for 1 ton of pig iron, and about 25 million tons of steel slag is generated annually in Korea. Steel slag can be classified into blast furnace (BF) slag and steel making slag. Blast furnace slag accounts for about 60% of all steel slag. It is widely used as cement raw material and used as civil engineering and construction materials. However, steelmaking slag has a high basicity and its utilization is restricted due to the pulverization behavior due to hydration reaction. Therefore, the recycling rate is limited to be about 20%, and the rest is accumulated in the factory or landfilled, causing environmental problems. This is becoming burdensome in steel industry. Therefore, it is one of the most important tasks to develop appropriate applications that can recycle steelmaking slag and increase added value. In this study, Fe-Ni slag, converter slag and dephosphorization slag generated from steel industry, and fly ash or bottom ash from a power plant were mixed in appropriate mixing ratio, and melted in a melting furnace on mass-production process for glass ceramics. Then the glass-ceramic products having basalt composition with SiO2, Al2O3, CaO, MgO, Fe2O3 components were fabricated through casting and heat treatment process. The comparison was made for the samples before and after the modification of process condition. Glass-Ceramic samples before and after the process modification were similar in chemical composition, but Al2O3 and Na2O contents were slightly higher in the samples before the modification. Before and after the process modification, it was confirmed that the sample had a melting temperature below 1250 oC, and the pyroxene and diopside are the primary phases in the product. The crystallization temperature in sample after modification was found to be higher than that in sample before modification. The activation energy for crystallization was evaluated as 467 kJ/mol of the sample before the process modification, and 337 kJ/mol of the sample after the process modification. The degree of crystallinity was evaluated as 82% before the process change and 87% after the process change, respectively. Mechanical properties such as compressive strength and bending strength were evaluated as excellent for the sample after the process modification. Optimized process for the production of glass-ceramic materials from steel industry slags and industrial waste was deduced through the evaluation of properties, facility modification and process control.

Speaker
Biography:

Milorad M. Cirkovic was a chief engineer for two decades in the primary production of copper in RTB Bor. In the Mining and Metallurgy Institute, he works on the projects for development the technologies for recycling the polymetalli cscrap, electronic waste and environment protection. He is the author of more than a hundred scientific papers and three patents

Abstract:

Permanent development of technology causes creation a significant amount of the secondary raw materials which are increasingly actualas Recent Publications the raw material base for many metals. Due to the fact that large amounts of metal are concentrated in waste materials with their high content, a great attention is given to this subject and numerous technologies are developed on the world stage today for recycling of this waste. Natural deposits of these metals are increasingly poorer so that the deposits of Cu-Zn alloys represent a significant potential for valuation the basic metals. This work presents the results of laboratory and pilot studies of brass decomposition in order to produce the basic metals (Cu and Zn) from brass scrap, because it is an important raw material base for production of these metals. The pilot plant consists of a rotary smelting furnace, capacity of 5 t, and special plant for gas treatment. The aim of this experiment was to remove zinc and accompanying metals by processing of these alloys and to produce copper. The produced copper has the following chemical composition: 99.03% Cu, 0.45% Zn, 0.46% Pb and 0.04%Sn. The amount of removed slag is 2-2.5% of the amount of charged material, and slag has the following chemical composition: 27.5% Cu, 38.92% Zn, 2.93% Fe, 6.03%SiO2 and 4.35%Cu(oxide).

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

In particular, the environment is a daily issue that is brought home to anyone, so that it is necessary to establish the infrastructure to drive technological development, despite the cost incurred to some extent. Therefore, it is needed to consider profitability of business as well as social and public aspects. This study intends to apply the feasibility evaluation and commercialization strategies to the waste resource recycling technologies with the trends of CO2 emissions reduction and waste-energy zero house, which are discussed at home and abroad This subject intends to evaluate CO2 emission of on-site composting facility which is a miniaturized version of a large-scale composting treatment facility, in order to accommodate a treatment capacity of less than 100 kg/day. This facility is installed in the apartment complex to avoid the need for separate collection and transportation by not discharging the food waste outside of the complex. In addition, this solves the odor and leachate problems associated with conventional collection and transportation, as the discharged food waste is treated immediately. As a result, the CO2 emission reduction effect to be excellent because, although the CO2 emission is slightly higher in the treatment stage than that in the large-scale composting facilities, this is more than offset by the fact that the collection–transportation and final disposal stages are omitted because of the smaller operation than those of large-scale composting treatment facilities. Through the this study, it aims to evaluate the benefits as economic values in connection with the social benefits including carbon emissions and energy use reduction, renewable energy production and local community vitalization. Through this study, it aims to evaluate the social benefits including carbon emissions and energy use reduction, renewable energy production and local community vitalization.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Statement of problem: Climate Change Adaptation and Resilience Building in urban areas to face up to climate change impacts mainly focus on mitigating threats, reducing vulnerabilities and increasing capacities to bounce back, thus exhibiting resilience and sustainability. However, what measures are there to counter the impacts of Climate Change which are also useful in providing health and environmental co-benefits and contribute to Climate Change mitigation? 

Researchers have shown that Climate change does not present new problems per se, but may worsen and shift the geographic distribution of existing problems.  Some sections of population may be more at risk:

·         Children, aged and disabled

·         Those living in flood plains and with poor quality housing.

Improper Solid Waste management in urban areas has been the cause of clogging of drains during heavy rainfall sometimes causing floods and at others, exacerbating the effects of floods by increasing contamination of water, soil and spreading infectious diseases, heavy metal bearing toxic waste and covering every surface with degrading material. Similarly, during heat waves, the methane from accumulated garbage in medium and large scale dumps have lead to spontaneous fires, contaminating air and generating particulate matter and gaseous fumes exacerbating respiratory illnesses and spreading infectious diseases. During winters and cold waves too, improper solid waste management can contribute to increased particulate matter concentration due to open burning of garbage resulting in allergy, infection and respiratory distress among all sections of the population particularly among children, elderly and immune-compromised patients.  

Theoretical Orientation and Methodology: Integrated Waste Management is one of the sectors in urban development, which offers solutions to Climate Change Adaptation, Resilience, contributes significantly to environmental and health co-benefits while also contributing to Climate Change mitigation.  This paper examines how Indian cities can adopt an Integrated Waste Management approach and achieve compliance to the Solid Waste, Plastics Waste, E-waste, Biomedical waste and Construction and Demolition Waste Management Rules all promulgated in 2016 by the Ministry of Environment, Forests and Climate Change, Government of India and earn environmental and health co-benefits too.

Findings: As a part of National Institute of Urban Affairs (NIUA), New Delhi, I undertook the exercise of integrating the above Rules and recommending source segregation of solid waste at household level, medium and bulk generators of different types of waste and arrived at processes of environmentally sound and productive recycling for each stream by which solid waste in a city becomes a resource and a source of income minus the  nuisance and pollution potential thus contributing to environmental and health co-benefits, increasing their adaptation and resilience potential. Since such processes of maximizing segregation of streams and recycling minimizes open burning or accumulation of methane, an integrated approach also contributes to climate change mitigation. Many of the processes recommended continue to operate under extreme weather events because they are decentralized and hence are ideal adaptation and resilience measures. Toxic and hazardous waste is also isolated and neutralized to prevent contamination.

Md. Abdul Jalil

Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Bangladesh

Title: Investigation of Biogas Generation from the Waste of a Vegetable and Cattle Market of Bangladesh
Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

The results of a study on the type and quantity of solid waste generated in a rural vegetable and cattle market, and biogas generation from the waste are presented in this paper. The market waste was collected, individual items were separated and measured on both normal days and haat days. During a normal day, it was found that very insignificant amount of waste was generated. But on a haat day, a large amount of wastes was found to be generated. On average, the amount of easily biodegradable waste was 589 kg out of the total waste of 1004 kg on a haat day. Cow dung, fish, ginger, cursed lobe, guava and banana leaves were the major biodegradable wastes. Other biodegradable wastes were goat dropping, bitter melon, pointed gourd, dhundul and brinjal. The total solids (TS) and volatile solids (VS) of the biodegradable portion of the market waste were determined and were found to be 17.94% and 13.87% respectively. Laboratory experiments were run order to generate biogas in anaerobic digesters using the same composition of the market waste. They were placed in a large closed chamber and room heaters were used to maintain the temperature of the chamber at a constant value. One set of batch experiments and another set of daily feed experiments were carried out. In the first set of experiments, 500 g and 750 g waste added in 2 digesters separately and inoculum was added to make the effective volume of 2.1 L for each digester. The experiments were operated for 46 days and the average temperature was found to be 34.7oC. In the second set of experiments, one digester was initially fed with 750 g waste having the effective volume of 2.2 L. Another two-chamber (connected in series) digester was initially fed with 750 g waste having the effective volume of 3 L. Then the daily feed was 18.75 g waste mixed with 20 mL of water with dispensing 40 mL slurry from the digester. The experiments were run for 40 days and the average temperature was 35.1oC. The results of the 1st set of experiments revealed that the daily biogas generation rates were 0..22 and 0.48 m3/m3 of digester volume for the concentrations of waste as 0.238 and 0.357 kg/L respectively for 40 days retention time, and the respective rates of biogas producton were 0.30 and 0.40 m3/kg of VS added. The results of the 2nd set of experments revealed that the daily production of biogas was 0.44 and 0.37m3/m3 of the digester volume for the one-chamber digester and two-chamber digester respectively. But in terms of per kg VS added, the average daily gas generation rates were 0.185 m3 and 0.212 m3 for the respective digesters.

Speaker
Biography:

Eyram is graduate researcher from Ghana who is working towards becoming an environmental scientist in order to help solve environmental issues across the world. Eyram is currently pursuing his Master’s program in Environmental Science and Engineering at Hohai University, China. His focus is to use waste products to make sustainable artefacts and help solve environmental problems. His research work is on Solid Waste Management where he uses Lignin, a waste by product from the Paper Making Industry, for sustainable road construction. He also worked as an assistant engineer on sanitary landfill development. These positions exposed him to the sanitation issues facing his country Ghana. Eyram hopes to seek knowledge in order to come up with innovative ways of solving the waste menace and the sanitation situation within his country, Ghana and across World

Abstract:

Concerns on the cost, over security of supply, and environmental impact of using petroleum-based materials have led to the modification and development of alternative asphalt binders for flexible pavements. The objective of this study is to investigate the thermal properties and the uniform miscibility of Kraft Lignin and petroleum asphalt blends using the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) over the entire range of composition. The study shows that 30% by weight of lignin can be added to asphalt to obtain uniformly mixed and a thermally stable binder composite. Lignin has a lower Td value than asphalt. An increase in the concentration of lignin in the composite reduces the Td value of the composite making the composite less thermally stable. The lowest Td value of the composite binder recorded was 280 °C while the mixing temperature of bitumen and aggregate is 165 °C. Thus, the addition of 30% had no negative results on the thermal stability of the composite. The thermal behaviour of these blends as measured by TGA suggests compatibility for the blends containing up to 30% (weight) of Kraft lignin. SEM results showed a uniform distribution of lignin of particle size less than 75µm in the bitumen. The infrared data show that the miscibility of the blends with varying concentrations was a physical reaction since the functional groups in both Lignin and bitumen remained intact in the composite. The thermal stability and the uniform distribution of lignin fibers in asphalt binder gives a positive indication that the composite can be used in asphalt pavements. Not only is the petroleum resource saved and the environment protected but there is an effective use of the solid waste material, lignin.

Speaker
Biography:

Kulzira Mamyrbayeva has extensive experience in the study of hydrometallurgical technology of processing poor oxidized and mixed ores, dumps and tailings. She studies the processes of metal concentrating and refining by extraction from productive solutions.

Abstract:

Involvement in the processing of previously unprocessed poor oxidized, mixed, persistent oxidized ores, as well as waste of beneficiating plants, is becoming an increasingly urgent task. The processing of such ores by traditional methods is very complex and inefficient. A large amount of copper is contained in the dumps of off-balance, hard-processing and stale ores of Kazakhstan. The practice of operating enterprises shows, that in the process of heap leaching of this type of raw material, it is possible to extract 40-60% of copper. Therefore, some tailings of leaching can also be considered as a potential raw material for copper recovery. The purpose of our studies was to extract copper from the tailings of leaching of the Kounrad deposit ore with a copper content of 0.32%. Physico-chemical studies found that the copper content in the leaching tail is 0.33% and the main oxidized copper minerals in the samples are malachite, azurite, cuprit; Sulphide minerals - chalcopyrite, covellite, chalcosine; The main iron minerals are siderite and pyrite, the waste rock is up to 80% silicon oxide, the rest are aluminum silicate, muscovite, potassium hydrogen sulfate, aluminum sulfate, kaolinite, andalusite, pyrophyllite, nacrite. Agitation leaching was conducted with solutions of sulfuric and hydrochloric acids of different concentrations, with and without the presence of an oxidizing agent. It was found that, during leaching process with sulfuric and hydrochloric acids without oxidizing agent, copper extraction increases with the increase of concentration and duration of the acids, and does not exceed 35%. In the presence of an oxidizer - hydrogen peroxide, the extraction rate of copper increases - up to 70%. Solutions with a copper content of up to 2.0 g/l were obtained by multi-stage leaching of samples. Concentration and refining of copper was carried out according to the scheme 2Е+1S with the extractant Lix 9858 NSC in kerosene. The extraction was carried out at a pH of 3.5, the ratio of the organic and aqueous phases -1.5, and the extractant concentration -10%. The degree of copper recovery in a two-staged extraction was 92%. The copper stripping was carried out with the electrolyte of the following composition, g/l: 35 Cu; 180 g/l Н2SO4, with the ratio of the organic and aqueous phases - 11.6. Under such conditions, the copper recovery is 98% and a solution with a copper content of up to 50 g / l is obtained. The results of the work are recommended for verification on an enlarged scale.

Speaker
Biography:

The first author is economic geologist and has been working on industrial minerals for the last many years. She has evaluated many industrial mineral resources for their use for industry. Moreover, her work on industrial mineral resources also takes into consideration the sustainability of the mineral deposits

Abstract:

Peshawar is a metropolitan city, the administrative center and the economic hub for the Federally Administered Tribal Areas of Pakistan. The province Khyber Pakhtunkhwa constitutes about more than 90% of the country’s total marble deposits. At Marble processing industries a marble slurry waste is produced by cutting, grinding and polishing machines which is dumped at the industry sites or on roads posing threat to the surrounding environment. This study focuses on the utilization of the slurry waste for use in making cement in order to reduce the burden of the waste on the environment, prevent the negative impact related with marble processing plants, preserve natural resources by reutilizing industrial wastes and reformulate by improving the properties of construction material. The marble waste slurry samples were characterized. The analyses include chemical composition, moisture content, specific gravity, fineness and water absorption. After characterization these samples were blended with various proportions of plaster of Paris, Portland cement, white cement, sand, fiber glass and pigments for use in the preparation of bricks and tiles. These blended samples were tested for compressive and flexural strengths, water absorption and density. This study has revealed that nearly all the mix proportions prepared by using plaster of Paris as binder failed to qualify for the American Standards for Testing Materials (ASTM) C55 for concrete building bricks. Whereas, most of the specimens having 10, 20 and 30% of marble dust along with Portland and white cement as binder qualify for compressive and flexural strengths while there is a huge impact of using glass fiber as reinforcer to increase the flexural strength of the specimens. The main findings of this study showed the economic feasibility of using marble slurry waste in the form of marble powder in the preparation of mix proportions of concrete bricks and tiles.

Syed MS Kazmi

Mirpur University of Science and Technology, Pakistan

Title: Production of eco-friendly burnt clay bricks incorporating waste glass sludge
Speaker
Biography:

Engr. Syed Minhaj Saleem Kazmi has completed his MSc Structural Engineering from University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore. His main research is focused on the sustainable and eco-friendly construction materials. He has published eleven (11) research papers in well reputed peer reviewed local and international journals, coordinated several national research projects and has been serving as Junior Lecturer at Mirpur University of Science and Technology, AJK, Pakistan

Abstract:

Clay bricks are the commonly used construction material worldwide. The main focus of this study is to utilize the waste glass sludge (WGS) in clay brick manufacturing as a secondary raw material. WGS was collected from a glass cutting and polishing industry. Brick specimens were prepared using various replacements of WGS (i.e., 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25% by clay weight) at an industrial brick manufacturing plant. A variety of durability and mechanical tests were conducted on the bricks to evaluate their performance. Results revealed that WGS modified bricks showed higher compressive and flexural strength in compared with traditional bricks. WGS addition reduced the unit weight of bricks resulting into economical and lighter structures. Moreover, durability properties of bricks like freeze-thaw, sulfate attack and efflorescence resistance were improved by adding WGS. It can be concluded that WGS can improve the mechanical and durability properties of clay bricks, leading towards more sustainable and economical construction.